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2021 Training Award Finalists Announced

The WA Government has announced the 2021 Training Award Finalists.

These are the individual finalists as announced by Minister Sue Ellery and their chosen pathways.

Apprentice of the Year Finalists

Hayden Carvell, Mundaring: Light Vehicle Automotive

red and white vintage car parked in front of blue and white food stall
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Some of Hayden’s fondest childhood memories involve holding a torch as his dad, grandad and pop tinkered under the bonnet of a car. The family connection and the ability to bring something broken back to life is what led the apprentice mechanic to study a Certificate III in Light Vehicle Automotive with North Metropolitan TAFE.

With on-the-job learning at mycar, Hayden has helped induct and teach new team members about safety, work practices and methods of fixing cars, and recognises that technology is moving quickly.

Joann Knight, Brabham: Heavy Mobile Equipment

Visiting Kalgoorlie’s ‘super pit’ as a child and seeing all of the machines in action was enough to convince Joann of a career in mechanics. She followed her childhood dream, completing an apprenticeship as a mobile plant mechanic and landed a job with BHP.

Joann was open to every opportunity as she completed the Automotive Technician (Heavy Mobile Equipment) course through the Westrac Institute, and wanted to show that women can work and achieve their dreams in a male-dominated industry.

Stacey-Lee Boothman, Cooloongup: Engineering – Mechanical Fitter

Mechanical Fitter

Stacey-Lee always loved pulling things apart to see how they worked, so much so that at the age of 12 she started building bicycles. After years working in painting, mining, hospitality management and government administration, Stacey Lee’s determination to pursue a career she is truly passionate about has come full circle, completing a Certificate III in Engineering – Mechanical Trade (Mechanical Fitter) through South Metropolitan TAFE, and she is just shy of achieving her Diploma in Engineering.

Stacey-Lee has had to battle health issues throughout her studies, making her achievement of winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s Apprentice of the Year 2020 even more special.

Christian Ferrone, Bayswater: Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

Certificate IV Aeroskills – Photo courtesy TAFE Gippsland

A curiosity for how things work and a love of aeroplanes led Christian to pursue a career as a Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer. Now employed by ExecuJet MRO Services Australia – where he completed his apprenticeship – the course taught him how to safely maintain gas turbine and propeller driven fixed wing aircraft.

Christian completed the Diploma in Aeroskills (Mechanical) with a 95 per cent course average and was in the first cohort of WA apprentices through RTO Aviation Australia.

Now a mentor for other apprentices coming through, Christian knows teamwork is an essential part of the aviation industry.

WA Trainee of the Year Finalists

Bonnie Barber, Bridgetown: Administration

Bonnie knew she wanted to join the mining industry when she was in her final year of school, but she did not know which career pathway to follow with the many options available in the sector.

relaxed female secretary with feet on table in workplace
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

An administration traineeship through Combined Team Services and working with Talison Lithium gave her the perfect mix of support and resources, and she found the ability to study and work a full-time job attractive.

Bonnie says the Certificate IV in Business qualification and hands-on experience has set her up for a fulfilling career working in a field she is passionate about, and she has now accepted a new position as Human Resource Administration Assistant working in her dream professional field.

Amber Ugle-Hayward, Karrinyup: Government

Wanting to pursue a career that was meaningful, challenging and would make a positive impact on the lives of many Western Australians, Amber applied for the Public Sector Commission’s Aboriginal Traineeship Program, knowing it would give her a ‘foot in the door’ to government. Amber has made the most of her placement with the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, gaining practical knowledge while completing a Certificate III in Government through Aspire Performance Training.

Throughout the traineeship, Amber has proactively sought opportunities to further her career and expand networks, establishing a reputation as a highly competent team member who consistently displays leadership, collaboration, respect and integrity.

Amber says the experience has allowed her to develop her confidence and communication skills to raise awareness of Aboriginal culture within the State Government, and directly influence the department’s internal policies.

Vikki Doecke, Kelmscott: Leadership and Management

Passionate about food and hospitality since becoming a chef in her early 20s, Vikki wanted to stay in the industry but broaden her career. Initially afraid to make the change into management, Vikki says she finally started living life on her terms.

A Certificate IV in Leadership and Management through Stanborough Wemyss Contracting was the perfect training alongside her Assistant Village Manager role with Sodexo, which provides catering and managing services at mine sites.

The course developed Vikki’s leadership skills so much so that she is now Village Manager of the Wintamarra site and thoroughly enjoys applying all of her past experience with her newly acquired skills.

WA Vocational Student of the Year finalists

Maxine Turner, Fremantle: Community Services

SCHOLARSHIP IN COMMUNITY SERVICES | Admission | Skilled Visa | Sponsored  Jobs | RPL

Volunteering throughout India and Vietnam helping disadvantaged children and families guided Maxine towards her chosen career. Completing a Diploma of Community Services through North Metropolitan TAFE led Maxine to gaining full-time work at the Department of Communities, Child Protection and Family Support, following a successful work experience stint.

Maxine now gets to carry out her passion for helping those in need on a daily basis, using the skills and knowledge obtained through her course in her role as a residential worker.

Nerine Boulter, White Gum Valley: Aquaculture

The first investment fund for sustainable fish farming | Virgin

Returning to study as a mature age student gave Nerine a passion for learning that she had not experienced before. Her enthusiasm for sustainable aquaculture has been ignited during completion of the Diploma of Aquaculture at South Metropolitan TAFE, where has excelled, nominated for the South Metropolitan TAFE’s Vocational Student of the Year in 2019 and 2020.

Nerine hopes to build her own sustainable, environmentally friendly business, growing and harvesting native seaweed for use in health foods, animal feed, cosmetics, bio-plastics and bio-fuel.

Meg Maroni, Albany: Information Technology

PC Technician | Definition, Job description, salary & Jobs!

Achieving a better future for her local community by implementing and demonstrating digital technologies led Meg to complete her Certificate IV in Information Technology at South Regional TAFE.

Now employed in the industry as the Technical Support Officer for Little Grove Primary School, Meg applies the skills gained in her studies every day to the upkeep of the school’s physical and networking digital infrastructure, and maintenance of implemented systems and software. Meg also assists teaching staff to design class exercises and assignments to fulfil their digital curriculum, and is now tutoring a student carrying out the same course she successfully completed.

Zoe Tucker, Bayswater: Landscape Design

Twenty years after leaving school, Zoe finally feels like she has found her pathway. Finding traditional work roles not conducive to family life, the single mother of three took the plunge towards a new career and followed her passion, studying a Certificate IV in Landscape Design – a perfect fit for a creative person with a love of plants and nature and background in architecture.

Zoe has not looked back, winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s Vocational Student of the Year 2020 and relishing the opportunity to create greener spaces.

WA Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander of the Year 2021 finalists

Kevin Wilson, Victoria Park: Graphic Design

Growing up as a Wongai man from the Goldfields region, Kevin has had an interest in art for as long as he can remember. After a few years and a few too many run-ins with police, he decided he could not keep going down that path, so he signed up for an apprenticeship in print finishing at North Metropolitan TAFE, which was just the beginning of his TAFE journey. After completing his Diploma in Graphic Design, he continued on to the Advanced Diploma, becoming more confident in himself, his work and how he speaks about it. Kevin says he feels like he has found his calling in life, and since finishing has gone on to co-found Nani Creative, a graphic design company specialising in design for projects promoting Aboriginal tourism.

Grant Syron, Como: Maritime Operations

Sailing the seas may not be for everyone, but for Grant, pursuing a maritime career was an opportunity to see the world, meet new people and have a new challenge every day. From growing up in a Sydney housing commission, Grant says he had wonderful role models in his hard-working parents, who showed him anything is achievable if you put your mind to it.

After completing the Diploma of Maritime Operations (Watchkeeper Deck) through South Metropolitan TAFE, Grant has gone on to become a second officer, with his qualification allowing him to travel the world working on any ship.

Grant’s hard work and commitment is an inspiration to the whole community, and he has ambitions to take his studies and career development even further, with his long-term goal of becoming a Master Mariner.

Keira Gentle, Ridgewood: Fashion Design and Merchandising

From a young age Keira wanted to design clothes, and after a massive life turn around she decided to take a leap and enrol in a Diploma of Applied Fashion Design and Merchandising at North Metropolitan TAFE. Juggling full-time study with being mum to her daughter, Keira said she has not looked back and is living her dream daily, with the opportunity to explore her creative side and the routine of study giving her the strength to manage her time and provide balance in her life.

Most importantly, studying the course has sparked her creative side that was always there but needed to be developed and nurtured.

Keira says that connection to creativity has been life changing, and she can now see a future where she can work in an industry that she loves, and has all the skills needed to develop a satisfying and challenging career.

Sterling Winmar, Orelia: Engineering – Industrial Electrician

Losing his father at the age of 13, Sterling did not know what he wanted to do with his life, but had the mental push to make his dad proud. Making the most of every opportunity that came his way, he jumped at the chance to take up an apprenticeship through South Metropolitan TAFE and the National Energy Technician Training Scheme (NETTS), completing a Certificate III in Engineering – Industrial Electrician.

His journey in the oil and gas sector has given him valuable life skills as well as experience in a thriving sector. Sterling has been a strong ambassador and role model, assisting younger apprentices and promoting the NETTS program by public speaking at schools.

WA School-based Apprentice of the Year finalists

Courtney Short, Ellenbrook: Commercial Cookery

Chef apprentice

Preparing meals with and for her family has always brought great joy to Courtney, so it seemed a natural fit to pursue her love of cooking at the age of 15, commencing a Certificate III in Commercial Cookery.

Successfully juggling her school work at Mercy College with an apprenticeship through North Metropolitan TAFE, Courtney says the knowledge and skills she has already developed by working alongside chefs at Pan Pacific Hotel (through Hospitality Group Training) are essential for working in the industry.

Now aged 17, Courtney is well on her way to achieving her dream of becoming a chef and she is so pleased she followed a VET pathway.

Taj Morris, Glenfield: Commercial Cookery

Working as a waiter in his nan and pop’s family restaurant gave Taj his first taste of the hospitality industry. With his mother and two uncles all chefs, cooking is in his blood, so it was an easy choice for Taj to do a school-based apprenticeship, taking on a Certificate III in Commercial Cookery at Geraldton’s Central Regional TAFE.

Taj says with a chef qualification he knows he will have many future employment opportunities and feels that the chance to learn practical industry skills while still studying at Nagle Catholic College has prepared him well.

Samantha Winter, Lower Chittering: Government

In Year 10 and unsure of what career pathway to pursue, Samantha heard about the Certificate II in Government through the Public Sector Commission’s school-based traineeship. Seeing it as a great opportunity, Samantha started the traineeship through Aspire Performance Training.

Juggling Year 12 at Bullsbrook College three days a week, a large portion of Samantha’s training is done on the job at Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety.

Samantha sees it as a major head start in the workforce, broadening her knowledge, making connections and gaining independence and confidence.

WA Cultural Diversity Training Award 2021 finalists

Marli Nicholls, Carlisle: English as an Additional Language

Adult Migrant English Program

With knowledge and experience already gained from her home country Brazil, Marli knew that the language barrier was the only thing in her way when relocating to Perth with her Australian husband and their children. 

Marli decided to take English classes to start her new life here, enrolling in Certificate IV EAL (English as an Additional Language) at South Metropolitan TAFE, to help her work, connect with people, make new friends and participate in the local community and her children’s school.

Marli says her course has offered her so much more than language skills, gaining self-confidence, time management, teamwork, problem-solving and leadership skills.

Agnes Toluwade, Leeming: Mental Health

260 million people and less than 1000 psychiatrists, Indonesia's mental  health worker shortage

Migrating from Nigeria in 2015, the first time Agnes heard about the suicide of a teenager on the news, she was jolted. Determined to take action and contribute to her new home country, Agnes decided to study a Certificate IV in Mental Health and be part of the solution for a mentally healthy Australia.

The course at North Metropolitan TAFE has helped her understand the many issues that impact on mental health and the ways to support people’s recovery.

Agnes has crossed several barriers to pursue her study and hopes that others in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities will see that studying at TAFE offers many opportunities.

WA International Student of the Year finalists

Johanna Faber, Yokine: Travel and Tourism

Johanna has always been passionate about travelling, so when she came to Australia from Germany in 2017 and fell in love with the country, she decided she wanted a career in travel and tourism.

By studying in a different country, Johanna felt it would offer her the opportunity of experiencing travel and tourism first-hand, taking part in a different culture and learning a new language while completing her course – a Diploma of Travel and Tourism Management at North Metropolitan TAFE.

Studying allowed Johanna to gain confidence in communicating in English while learning the many facets of the industry, and she was able to land a job as a travel consultant. While COVID-19 forced the closure of the office, it has not deterred Johanna from working in the industry.

Shalynn Buss, Lathlain: Event Management

Back in Canada in 2014, Shalynn was studying Business Administration to become a lawyer. During her studies she took an introduction to events elective course, which sparked her love of creating something out of nothing that brought people together. Fast forward to July 2020, she finally took the plunge into formalising her passion, starting a Diploma of Event Management through South Metropolitan TAFE.

Experience has shown Shalynn she learns best in vocational settings, continually challenging herself and demonstrating her skills and abilities in real-world scenarios, which lead to winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s International Student of the Year 2020.

Shalynn has been putting her industry knowledge into practice, working for a small wedding and event business, and she hopes to one day own her own wedding planning business.

Aurelie Jammes, Scarborough: Event Management

Adelaide Convention Centre | ULA Group

With a Masters degree in Events, Tourism and Hospitality and experience working around the world, French native Aurelie was employed at a winery in the Swan Valley when she realised she enjoyed in-house events. When COVID-19 hit she did not let losing her job get in the way, taking the opportunity to enhance her knowledge about this part of the industry by starting a Diploma of Event Management at South Metropolitan TAFE.

Aurelie says it was the best decision she ever made, now working as a hotel event operations supervisor. Aurelie is also an ambassador for Go Study, sharing her challenges and achievements as in international student in Australia.

Congratulations on getting to the finals. Good Luck

Bev Johnson

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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Help students to transition to Life Beyond School: Infographic

Get your copy of the Help Students to Transition to Life Beyond School infographic.

Career Education

Whatever you have been investing in career education in the past, you will be most likely to invest more in the future. Teachers can become learning coordinators by connecting with others to form a learning network. This infographic gives you ideas about who you can collaborate with to support students to gain skills for life beyond school.

Engage and Collaborate Framework

  • Dave Turner created the WE3 Framework which supports the move from exposing primary school students to career ideas, through exploration in middle school and work experience for senior students.
  • Dave told me to connect with Ian Palmer on LinkedIn. He is from School Industry Partnerships. There are some good tips for parents, teachers and students on there including information about work experience.
  • You can explore opportunities for schools to engage with industry at Re-engineering Australia.
  • A long time favourite of mine is Youth Central in Victoria.
  • We don’t have anything like it in WA but we do have a Community Directory where you can find services in your area.

Middle School Ideas

Middle school is when students start to explore on their own. They test our boundaries as they strive to create their independence.

Direct the energy of middle school students through these ideas.

Students can check out ideas on this Coggle Map.

5 Steps to Engagement

There are just 5 steps to get in place when you want to start collaborating with community or industry.

  1. Governance: Agree on what you are trying to achieve together, who will be responsible for what bits, and to what standard.
  2. Business Rules: All organisations have rules that govern how things are done within the organisation. These are often about your priorities as an education providers. SCSA delivers some of our rules for example.
  3. Legal Framework: Schools are governed by duty of care, privacy and equal opportunity.
  4. Financial Management: Schools need to be accountable for the money that they spend and for the way that resources are used.
  5. Technical Framework: You will need to have some IT standards that ensure interoperability on one hand and privacy and security of data on the other.

Get clear, trusted career information that gives your students opportunities to find their dream. Subscribe to In Focus Careers News.

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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University resources for career teachers in Western Australia

With so much competition for school leavers, teachers have plenty of opportunities to engage with universities.

All West Australian universities provide one on one career interviews. Everyone should talk to a career advisor at their chosen university before they enrol.

All universities also do campus tours and special information evenings. You can find an updated calendar of events in the In Focus Careers Newsletter.

Schools can invite career counsellors to give presentations at schools or attend school expos.

Murdoch workshops for high schools

Murdoch Outreach have been working hard to develop an online offer to help support teachers and school communities. Explore our wide range of online workshops and our inspiring podcast series.

Explore our online workshops

Your high school students can participate in our Outreach workshops, but online! Get them to explore the curriculum, build new skills and develop a deeper understanding of subjects through our series of free online STEM, HASS and Creative Arts and Communication workshops, which can be booked by teachers for a whole class.

female science student inspecting glass beakers

STEM workshops

In our STEM workshops, students will develop their critical thinking and teamwork skills through using their imagination to solve challenges, crack codes, write algorithms, explore probability and design and build machines.

Find out more

Murdoch student Alice chatting with friends

HASS workshops

What is criminology? Can we lower our carbon footprint? How do businesses work and what do marketers do? Get your students to explore all these questions and more while working with their classmates in our HASS workshops.

Find out more

two male students broadcasting in a radio studio

Creative Arts and Communication workshops

In our Creative Arts and Communication workshops your students will explore digital painting, pixel art, portfolio design, personal branding, design thinking and ideation, the principles of graphic design and much more.

Find out more

Explore our Murdoch Minds podcast series

Join us for our Murdoch Minds podcast series where you will hear from our free thinking academics as we explore their career paths, current research projects and more.

Find out more

Curtin Support for schools

Two male students walking through a crowded area holding up help signs

Curtin AHEAD in School

Curtin AHEAD is a dynamic outreach program, fostering the potential of individuals and groups underrepresented in higher education. We work with high schools to raise aspirations and build learning skills, delivering workshops, on-campus experiences, mentoring programs and career-developing activities.

EcoChallenge Australia

EcoChallenge Australia provides an exciting and authentic learning experience for students in Years 5-12 through the online strategic game, Aqua Republica, to explore issues and solutions relating to water management and sustainable development. EcoChallenge Australia incorporates a sustained engagement with the principles of water usage across industrial, urban and agricultural systems and the impact upon ecosystems.

Innovative Schools Consortium

Through a partnership with Curtin, secondary schools can help their high achievers fulfil their true potential. Identified students participate in programs that build their skills and strengths in innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship. They receive a record of their achievements that can be used towards meeting university admission criteria, gaining accelerated entry into Curtin or supporting their scholarship applications. Download the Innovative Schools Consortium flyer – [.pdf 270kB]

Learning Futures Network

Comprising more than 140 schools, industry and community organisations, the Learning Futures Network is focused on driving transformation across student learning and the future of work, while building deep learning relationships across communities.

The network provides an avenue for schools to collaborate with Curtin, and learn more about higher education, alternative entry pathways, and professional learning and postgraduate opportunities for teachers. Join the Learning Futures Network.

Professional Learning Hub

Curtin’s commitment to teaching and teachers continues after graduation. Our Professional Learning Hub enables our alumni to remain inspired, informed and current in their classrooms. Our innovative, practical and research-based workshops contribute to teacher PD hours, building better educational outcomes for the community through greater job satisfaction.

Curtin’s School of Education also offers networking sessions and presentations for teaching professionals.

Benefit from the Professional Learning Hub.

STEM Outreach

STEM Outreach offers engaging and innovative programs that connect your school and community to STEM and Curtin research. We deliver programs, workshops, camps, excursions, incursions and competitions for students and teachers across metropolitan and regional Western Australia. See all the ways your school can get involved with STEM Outreach.

UniReady in Schools

The UniReady Enabling Program is one of Curtin’s alternative entry pathway programs. It has been approved as an endorsed program for high schools in Western Australia and can be run as part of the high school curriculum. It not only makes up a high school student’s WACE but, if completed successfully, also means the student is eligible to apply for a range of Curtin undergraduate courses.

Presently the course is offered as part of a pilot with a limited number of places. If your school is interested in the program, you will need to make an application to UniReady and pay a program licence.

Contact unireadyinschools@curtin.edu.au or call +61 8 9266 7632 for more information.

AIME

Through the AIME Mentoring program, Curtin students are empowering Indigenous high school students, giving them the skills and confidence to grow and succeed. Read more about AIME

High school resources

This dedicated page provides resources to all the key questions we receive from high school students around admission pathways, study areas, scholarships, how to apply and understanding prerequisites. This will be a key resource for you to distribute to students with everything they need in one place. Visit the high school resources page

UWA Career advisers and teachers

Here you can access resources, request school visits or on-campus experiences, and keep up to date with the latest information to help your students find their path to UWA.  You can find the information HERE.

Career adviser in discussion with a staff member and a student

School Engagement team

The School Engagement team supports students in Years 10–12 to make informed decisions about their future study options. Our team can advise on UWA courses, opportunities, scholarships, accommodation options, admissions pathways and more.

Please contact us directly for further information and to book:

  • presentations at your school
  • campus tours
  • attendance at careers expos, fairs and information events

You can also sign up to receive our regular e-newsletter, which covers opportunities, events and activities for your school, as well as the latest information on UWA courses and admissions. Contact the School Engagement team on schools@uwa.edu.au.

Notre Dame For Career Advisors

Careers Advisor hold the key to guiding students to their future opportunities.

To best direct students’ potential towards education and career choices that will enrich their lives, you need to know the facts.

We’ve gathered everything you need to know here to support you in your vital role.

If you have any questions please get in touch.

BOOK A PRESENTATION EVENTS 

BOOK A 1-ON-1 SESSION

Exploring opportunities outside school should not be a huge burden for teachers. These resources are designed to support teachers and students. If you are looking for something different for your school, contact your local university and request the help you need.

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Building Back Better – Indigenous Land Management Careers

Greta Thunberg inspired us to stand together and make a noise in the fight for action against climate change. Indigenous land management careers are gaining traction as a uniquely Australian response to climate change which will build back agriculture better.

Greta Thunberg Photo courtesy The Guardian

Careers incorporating traditional land management practices are gaining popularity as Australians work to learn more about sustainable farming.

TAFE’s Move to Traditional Land Management

Murchison environmentalist Michael Clinch told me that…

Australia’s biggest export is its top soil.

Michael Clinch on Murchison rangelands

In response to the regenerative farming movement that is happening across the region, Central Regional TAFE has introduced Indigenous regenerative land management as part of the College’s agricultural program.

First Indigenous Chair for Biodiversity and Environmental Science

Curtin University has appointed Australian ecologist Dr Stephen van Leeuwen as Australia’s first Indigenous Chair for Biodiversity and Environmental Science.

Dr Stephen van Leeuwen
Dr Stephen van Leeuwen

He will lead research programs promoting excellence and innovation in the fields of biodiversity and environmental science through collaborative networks within Indigenous communities and the broader academic community in Western Australia, Australia and internationally.

See Curtin University Environmental Sciences HERE.

Murdoch University also has a reputation for outstanding Environmental and Conservation Sciences

Dark Emu Aboriginal Australia and the Birth of Agriculture

Bruce Pascoe wrote Dark Emu Aboriginal Australia and the Birth of Agriculture which revived awareness of the extensive farming practices undertaken across all of Australia prior to Europeans coming. He was recently on 7am talking about work he is doing to regenerate a property using traditional Aboriginal farming methods that he learned while writing his book.

He said young people are showing increasing interest in traditional agriculture and he thinks they will be the ones who will take on Indigenous farming practices with a passion.

You can hear his talk HERE.

Adopting traditional land management practices is an important strategy for regenerating Australia’s farmlands. Starting a career in this field could lead to a life of discovery and achievement.

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It’s Career Expo Time Again – Get tips on how to get the most from your visit

Tip 1: Don’t sign ANYTHING.

The Careers Expo is great fun. There are happy, smiling people. There are glossy brochures and beautiful displays. People on the stands are friendly and helpful. Of course they are! They are professionals. You aren’t going to buy something from someone who isn’t nice.

Many visitors sign up for thousands of dollars worth of training based on a noisy 5 minute discussion in the crowded Convention Centre.

The Expos are a prime marketing place for all education and training organisation. They spend a lot of money on their displays and get their best, nicest, most professional sales people to tell you about their courses.

Tip 1:

Don’t sign ANYTHING.

STEP 2:

Know that the biggest displays, those closest to the entry doors, and the most professional looking displays have spent the most money on trying to sell to you.

STEP 3:

Check out the list of Exhibitors. 

Some are pure information, like the WA Police Force, Construction Training Fund, WA Department of Education – Teaching and Defence Force Recruiting. Others have courses they would like you to know about.

If you are interested in having a Gap Year check out which exhibitors will have information that will interest you. If you are interested in Trades, check out the ones that you must visit.

https://www.careers-expo.com.au/visitors/exhibitor-list-floor-plan

Make the decision about which ones to visit before you get sucked in by the bright lights and music!

STEP 4:

Figure out three questions to ask exhibitor one before you meet with them. Make sure one of your questions is about price if they are selling courses.

Don’t be surprised if they don’t want to answer you about. You may get answers like “It depends on…… ” and “We have a great loan to cover your costs”.

You could also ask….

  • How much will it cost?
  • How long the course will take.
  • What are the entry requirements.
  • For contacts with current students.
  • What successful students are like.
  • Do they have a mid year intake.
  • If they have links with industry that provides work placement.
  • How long it takes their graduates to get a job in the industry.
  • What sort of work graduates get.

STEP 5 – FINAL STEP

Go to see your career advisor to discuss what you have discovered.

If you don’t know a career advisor go to a Jobs and Skills Centre and talk with them. Its FREE. The Jobs and Skills Centres are based in TAFE colleges but they also have information about unis.

Go back to the places you are interested in. You will end up paying a lot for your course. This is probably the first BIG thing you have ever bought. Make sure you are buying something that is perfect for you.

Testimonial:

Thanks for the latest newsletter Bev, and for all the information and inspiring ideas over the year. Since I have become a part of  the (In Focus Careers) network I have grown in knowledge and motivation to really make a difference for our young people. 

(South West Regional Government High School.)

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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5 Steps to being a leading career educator

Career education isn’t social work and it isn’t psychology, although it could be a bit like fortune telling if you don’t keep up with the changes to career development.

Predicting the future

These 5 clear steps will help you to build your capacity to confidently lead students to their best career.

Be an expert

You can’t wing it as a career advisor. People believe you are the expert. People believe what you say. A flippant comment or ill informed advice from you can change the direction of their lives.

Don’t do computer programming. Computers are a passing fad.

1990’s Phys Ed Teacher/Career Advisor to high school student in Geraldton

You have a personal responsibility to be the expert, to KNOW where to look for the right information.

Empower yourself with knowledge

STEP 1: Get a qualification. Join professional organisations. Make sure your skills are current.

Listening

Moore’s Law says the capacity of computers doubles every two years. I think the pace of change is doubling every two years. I look back on 2019 and it seems like ancient history.

You can’t keep up with the changes that every student is experiencing. What they bring to the table in 2021 is going to be vastly different to what you would have expected from a similar student in 2019.

Students even look different

If you bring a deep appreciation of how much things have changed to the table, you will be more able to listen, empathise and question until you understand.

STEP 2: Appreciate the world view of your student.

Research

Everyone, from the OECD and World Economic Forum to teachers writing to parents, is trying to help people to make rational, data driven career decisions.

There is so much change flickering into view. Career advisors must be able to discriminate between the latest bright, new, shiny thing, and a substantial initiative that could deliver a lifetime of career satisfaction.

Actively study the research

STEP 3: Do the hard yards. Study the research. Go to conferences. Keep up with professional developments.

Tech Tools

I love tech. The latest gadget, app, block chain initiative sends me down rabbit holes for hours.

If you don’t love tech, you need to figure out how to keep up.

Know your digital world

STEP 4: Find out about digital career tools at meetings, conferences and workshops.

Collaboration

When I worked in Arnhem Land the whole community worked to support students to find their best career.

We had NorForce (Defence) taking on cadets, unionists working as Master (Electrician) Mentors to would-be apprentices, the principal’s sister in Cairns providing accommodation to an interior design work experience student. Every business in town was willing to take people for work experience. Ex students and community members were mentoring students.

Throughout Western Australia, there is significant goodwill on the table waiting to engage with and support students who want to explore career opportunities and develop knowledge and skills.

Work with others

STEP 5: Reach out and collaborate with your community, with industry or with the In Focus Careers network to expand the opportunities available to your students.

Deliver Insanely Great Career Education

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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Is it time to become a butterfly? My commitment as incoming WA President of the CDAA

butterfly

Since I took on the In Focus Careers Resources Centre, I have been cocooned in my home office, endeavouring to set up the world’s best career education support network right here in WA. 

2021 is my time to break out of my cocoon and spread my wings.

I have stepped up to take on the role of President of the WA Division of the Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) for 2021.

The more I work with the CDAA the more I appreciate their professional commitment to: 

  • Collaboration
  • Excellence and
  • Empowering members

They are a cool group of enthusiastic leaders that I wanted to support in the best way I can. 

My Commitment

butterflyI will be a visible leader who works to build the profile of our industry. 

Career services are frequently seen as a “nice to have” luxury by people as they pursue their ad hoc and busy work of getting a qualification and getting a job.

I will:

  • advocate for collaboration between career professionals and with government, industry and community to build our authority in strategic and operational endeavours
  •  enthusiastically share ideas, engage with others and influence the professional development services to achieve excellence in our industry
  • raise awareness of our power to boost educational achievement, focus career aspirations, and improve quality of life.

Invitation to YouMany butterflies

My ask of you is that you….

engage with the CDAA with courage and creativity to become leaders of change with new approaches to the problems of today and tomorrow.

We need experienced, visionary career professionals to be at the core of decision making, advocating for the human and financial value that career services deliver. 

You can join the CDAA HERE  or support our efforts by attending CDAA events, forwarding your ideas and actively promoting career professionals in Western Australia.

Next Steps

The West Australian CDAA Committee is coming to my place for lunch on Thursday and we will set priorities and add to the CDAA calendar that has already been planned for 2021. 

  • Lisa Liang has already planned the first network breakfast for February at Dome in East Vic Park and it is  up on the CDAA Calendar. I will publish that information when it is ready. 
  • Career Connect Rob Palmer has been working for months with Notre Dame to organise the Career Connect seminar for 12 February. 
  • Rob is also the organiser of the Community of Practice meetings which happen on the 4th Tuesday of each month. Rob has suggested that we start these meeting with a short presentation from an expert before we move onto our informal chat.
  • CEAWA  has agreed to work with us to build on the efforts put in by Robyn Ekberg, CEAWA and Rebecca Herbertson CDAA that were stopped due to COVID in 2020.
  • Janine Blake (nee Kannemeyer) has secured the support of the Food Fibre and Timber ITC which is making its meeting rooms available to our Committee.  
brown and white swallowtail butterfly under white green and brown cocoon in shallow focus lens

Bev Johnson

2021 CDAA WA Division President

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Cyril Jackson’s Partnership Model

Vanessa Buemi is Program Coordinator of VET and Curriculum at Cyril Jackson Senior Campus (CJSC). Cyril Jackson is one of a growing number of schools in Western Australia that is engaging with community, government and industry to deliver collaborative learning to students.

Towards the end of last year Vanessa invited me to an industry breakfast that recognised support that had been given to their students from outside the school.

Vanessa has kindly allowed me to share her welcome speech which provides insights about their Partnership Model.

Breakfast prepared and presented by Cyril Jackson Hospitality students

Vanessa’s Speech

Good morning and thank you for attending our inaugural Industry Breakfast. I’d like to speak about Partnerships at CJSC and our Partnership Model.

In 2021, CJSC trainers will deliver the following Nationally Accredited Certificates.

  • Active volunteering
  • Automotive vocational preparation
  • Business
  • Community services
  • Creative Industries
  • Engineering pathways
  • Hospitality
  • Information digital media and technology 1+2
  • Music
  • Visual arts
  • Technical graphics/CAD
  • World of Work

CJSC has historically delivered a diverse range of certificate qualifications, across 7 training industries. In the new Covid world, it is more important than ever before to prepare our students to be successful contributors in our ever evolving new world.

New world, new skills

COVID has changed the employment landscape and whilst we were already proving quality training to students we want to make it even better.  Our models link students with authentic work and learning opportunities with employers in the same industries they are completing their training.

Teaching and training is enhanced through connections with the world of work and beyond.

Year 11 Plus Program

Our Yr 11 PLUS program has been providing such opportunities for the last 5 years, initially through a Certificate 1 in Work Preparation and later, Certificate 1 in Business. VET in schools, now called VET delivered to secondary students, has enabled students to begin their training whilst still completing their schooling. University pathways once considered the superior pathway to higher studies has not always been the preferred pathway for all students. We all learn differently, and VET and Workplace Learning opportunities have opened the doors for many, many students.

Policy Changes Delivered a Challenge to CJ Programs

In education, the 2016 new WACE requirements of requiring an ATAR or Certificate II qualification as the minimum requirement to achieve WACE, failed to recognise a substantial proportion of students learning needs; students like those who choose to come to Cyril Jackson to learn English.

Certificate I qualifications were largely overlooked as they did not meet minimum requirements for WACE. Certificate I qualifications disappeared from our auspicing choices and the education gap grew once again.

Our 11 PLUS program, often considered a second chance for students who have disengaged from school for many different reasons, including sociology economic and mental health reasons, has been affected by the disappearance of certificate one qualifications on scope for auspicing.

Innovative Solution to Tricky Problem

Finding a certificate II qualification that would be a suitable fit for the overall program and one that would provide new opportunities to thrive was difficult at first….then I found Certificate II in Active Volunteering which was only on scope for delivery in the Eastern States.

I contacted the provider and literally begged them to get it on scope in WA and told them we would be their trial school. That provider is now one of the largest vocational training providers for VET delivered to secondary Schools in WA.

This qualification fits perfectly with the other courses in the program; our Trainer, Teacher and Student Support Officer had the freedom to make academic and practical links with the content of this qualification and SCSA courses such as English, maths and career and enterprise.

This model works!

Links with Industry

It worked with a certificate I and it works with the certificate II in Active Volunteering because of the links with industry that form an essential role in their education at CJSC.

With the removal of certificate I qualifications it is not enough to simply train students and send them out into the world of work. We have to teach them how to transition from school to work or post school training.

Active Volunteering is a powerful qualification, one that allows students to work with members of the community as mentors and friends for others in need.  It has been the foundation of personal and academic growth for once disengaged students, who have applied their learning in a safe and supportive environment.

How Cyril Jackson has met Challenges

Some of our students at CJSC start their schooling in our Intensive English Centre. Some have limited schooling and our classrooms may be their first opportunities to have an education. Our dedicated staff support our students in their transition from the Intensive English Centre (IEC) into mainstream, where they begin their Year 11 and 12 studies.

When I first started at CJSC in 2016 I sought to understand more about how the IEC worked and how I could best serve the students in my role as VET Coordinator. In just three years, through working with Belinda and the student services IEC and mainstream teams, we have trialled several successful models to ensure our students next transition into employment or further training is suitably supported. We have done this through dedicated Foundation English and workplace learning classes, building links with written and spoken communication in both a school and work environment.

The health industry, specifically aged care, has always been a strong career choice for some of our IEC graduates and we have worked hard to bridge the gap for our English as Second Language or Dialect, or EAL/D students, whose written and spoken English is still developing.  Opportunities for our students to gain places in funded courses can be competitive and this has often meant these students have to wait until they complete Year 12 before can begin their vocational training.

Partnership with North Metro

In 2019 we entered into a partnership with North Metro TAFE establishing a dedicated EAL/D class of CJSC students to begin their VET delivered to secondary students training whilst also completing their courses at CJSC.

All 13 students graduated in June 2020 amidst the unpredictable early days of Covid interruptions to education and face to face classes.

These students have recently completed Yr 12 and this cohort meets again on Thursday to begin their higher studies in the health industry, through our new partnership with Amana Living.

Going Beyond the Campus

What makes both of these models work is the CJSC approach to supporting students, not only in the classroom but also through community work placements that allow our students to apply their skills through authentic learning opportunities. We aim to develop further partnerships such as these.

Every single staff member is invested in these students

Our students are supported by our team of teachers, trainers, workplace learning coordinator, IEC teachers and education assistants, our student services team, Deputy Principals and our remarkable Principal, Dr Karen Read. 

They are our future and we are incredibly proud of our programs, team approach and most importantly our students who value education as a privilege.

You will not find a more dedicated school community and students with a phenomenal work ethic and will to succeed.

Our current partnerships include;

  • Aegis Bassendean
  • Amana Living,
  • DADAA
  • Ertech,
  • Garden City Plastics,
  • Plantrite
  • Black Swan State Theatre
  • WA Youth Theatre Company
  • Leeuwin Ocean Adventure Foundation, and
  • the Cities of Bassendean and Stirling.

We hope to work with you in 2021, building strong working relationships in support of our future workforce.

Editors Note:

Thanks Vanessa and staff at Cyril Jackson. Our hearts burst with appreciation for the wonderful work you are all doing. As one student spoke I choked up and reached for a tissue, I glanced around to see EVERYONE at our table was in the same boat!!

Vanessa Buemi

At the end of the morning there were hugs and congratulations all round.

Vanessa has already offered to support teachers at Balcatta SHS by sharing details of how CJ has generated such a great environment for its students. I am sure she would be happy to pass on her wisdom to others.

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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What’s the best way to record your micro credentials?

You probably need to capture what you are learning through short courses. Your record just needs to reflect what you want it to do. For example…..

My needs are simple

I don’t want to track every 2 hour Canva course that I do but I would like to keep a track of career webinars and conferences that I attend.

I would like to be able to record:

  • The name of each event
  • Key learning from each one
  • Who delivered the information
  • Date, time and a URL.

It would be good to be able to colour code different categories of learning so that I can easily see emerging trends.

Capturing Career Development Learning

Craig Hillman, from Helena College, recommends that teachers record reading the Infocus Careers Newsletter as PD on the WA Teacher Registration Board. 

His system has been adopted by a lot of teachers to demonstrate their commitment to becoming experts in their field, without a qualification.

The trick to finding the best system is to understand how you would use it

I would:

  • See what is trending from speakers in Australia and around the world.
  • Attach a copy of the data to job applications if it was able to be seen as a snapshot
  • Go back and check on notes for speeches and articles.

Figure out what functions you want your system to deliver as a first step, then start searching for options that deliver them and compare to see which one is the best fit. Be wary of the biggest and best available as it may do a lot of things that you don’t need.

After doing my simple analysis of what functions I need, I think a simple Excel spreadsheet will do the job.

Start by figuring out what you need

A quick analysis of how you would use your records will deliver the solution that you need, at least for the near future. A digital record can always be attached to a job application, and a potential employer can ask you about the courses you have done, even if they aren’t accredited courses.

Become part of the Network of West Australian professionals who are working to deliver the best career guidance in the world. 

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Bev Johnson

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au