Posted on 1 Comment

Is it time to become a butterfly? My commitment as incoming WA President of the CDAA

butterfly

Since I took on the In Focus Careers Resources Centre, I have been cocooned in my home office, endeavouring to set up the world’s best career education support network right here in WA. 

2021 is my time to break out of my cocoon and spread my wings.

I have stepped up to take on the role of President of the WA Division of the Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) for 2021.

The more I work with the CDAA the more I appreciate their professional commitment to: 

  • Collaboration
  • Excellence and
  • Empowering members

They are a cool group of enthusiastic leaders that I wanted to support in the best way I can. 

My Commitment

butterflyI will be a visible leader who works to build the profile of our industry. 

Career services are frequently seen as a “nice to have” luxury by people as they pursue their ad hoc and busy work of getting a qualification and getting a job.

I will:

  • advocate for collaboration between career professionals and with government, industry and community to build our authority in strategic and operational endeavours
  •  enthusiastically share ideas, engage with others and influence the professional development services to achieve excellence in our industry
  • raise awareness of our power to boost educational achievement, focus career aspirations, and improve quality of life.

Invitation to YouMany butterflies

My ask of you is that you….

engage with the CDAA with courage and creativity to become leaders of change with new approaches to the problems of today and tomorrow.

We need experienced, visionary career professionals to be at the core of decision making, advocating for the human and financial value that career services deliver. 

You can join the CDAA HERE  or support our efforts by attending CDAA events, forwarding your ideas and actively promoting career professionals in Western Australia.

Next Steps

The West Australian CDAA Committee is coming to my place for lunch on Thursday and we will set priorities and add to the CDAA calendar that has already been planned for 2021. 

  • Lisa Liang has already planned the first network breakfast for February at Dome in East Vic Park and it is  up on the CDAA Calendar. I will publish that information when it is ready. 
  • Career Connect Rob Palmer has been working for months with Notre Dame to organise the Career Connect seminar for 12 February. 
  • Rob is also the organiser of the Community of Practice meetings which happen on the 4th Tuesday of each month. Rob has suggested that we start these meeting with a short presentation from an expert before we move onto our informal chat.
  • CEAWA  has agreed to work with us to build on the efforts put in by Robyn Ekberg, CEAWA and Rebecca Herbertson CDAA that were stopped due to COVID in 2020.
  • Janine Blake (nee Kannemeyer) has secured the support of the Food Fibre and Timber ITC which is making its meeting rooms available to our Committee.  
brown and white swallowtail butterfly under white green and brown cocoon in shallow focus lens

Bev Johnson

2021 CDAA WA Division President

Posted on Leave a comment

Cyril Jackson’s Partnership Model

Vanessa Buemi is Program Coordinator of VET and Curriculum at Cyril Jackson Senior Campus (CJSC). Cyril Jackson is one of a growing number of schools in Western Australia that is engaging with community, government and industry to deliver collaborative learning to students.

Towards the end of last year Vanessa invited me to an industry breakfast that recognised support that had been given to their students from outside the school.

Vanessa has kindly allowed me to share her welcome speech which provides insights about their Partnership Model.

Breakfast prepared and presented by Cyril Jackson Hospitality students

Vanessa’s Speech

Good morning and thank you for attending our inaugural Industry Breakfast. I’d like to speak about Partnerships at CJSC and our Partnership Model.

In 2021, CJSC trainers will deliver the following Nationally Accredited Certificates.

  • Active volunteering
  • Automotive vocational preparation
  • Business
  • Community services
  • Creative Industries
  • Engineering pathways
  • Hospitality
  • Information digital media and technology 1+2
  • Music
  • Visual arts
  • Technical graphics/CAD
  • World of Work

CJSC has historically delivered a diverse range of certificate qualifications, across 7 training industries. In the new Covid world, it is more important than ever before to prepare our students to be successful contributors in our ever evolving new world.

New world, new skills

COVID has changed the employment landscape and whilst we were already proving quality training to students we want to make it even better.  Our models link students with authentic work and learning opportunities with employers in the same industries they are completing their training.

Teaching and training is enhanced through connections with the world of work and beyond.

Year 11 Plus Program

Our Yr 11 PLUS program has been providing such opportunities for the last 5 years, initially through a Certificate 1 in Work Preparation and later, Certificate 1 in Business. VET in schools, now called VET delivered to secondary students, has enabled students to begin their training whilst still completing their schooling. University pathways once considered the superior pathway to higher studies has not always been the preferred pathway for all students. We all learn differently, and VET and Workplace Learning opportunities have opened the doors for many, many students.

Policy Changes Delivered a Challenge to CJ Programs

In education, the 2016 new WACE requirements of requiring an ATAR or Certificate II qualification as the minimum requirement to achieve WACE, failed to recognise a substantial proportion of students learning needs; students like those who choose to come to Cyril Jackson to learn English.

Certificate I qualifications were largely overlooked as they did not meet minimum requirements for WACE. Certificate I qualifications disappeared from our auspicing choices and the education gap grew once again.

Our 11 PLUS program, often considered a second chance for students who have disengaged from school for many different reasons, including sociology economic and mental health reasons, has been affected by the disappearance of certificate one qualifications on scope for auspicing.

Innovative Solution to Tricky Problem

Finding a certificate II qualification that would be a suitable fit for the overall program and one that would provide new opportunities to thrive was difficult at first….then I found Certificate II in Active Volunteering which was only on scope for delivery in the Eastern States.

I contacted the provider and literally begged them to get it on scope in WA and told them we would be their trial school. That provider is now one of the largest vocational training providers for VET delivered to secondary Schools in WA.

This qualification fits perfectly with the other courses in the program; our Trainer, Teacher and Student Support Officer had the freedom to make academic and practical links with the content of this qualification and SCSA courses such as English, maths and career and enterprise.

This model works!

Links with Industry

It worked with a certificate I and it works with the certificate II in Active Volunteering because of the links with industry that form an essential role in their education at CJSC.

With the removal of certificate I qualifications it is not enough to simply train students and send them out into the world of work. We have to teach them how to transition from school to work or post school training.

Active Volunteering is a powerful qualification, one that allows students to work with members of the community as mentors and friends for others in need.  It has been the foundation of personal and academic growth for once disengaged students, who have applied their learning in a safe and supportive environment.

How Cyril Jackson has met Challenges

Some of our students at CJSC start their schooling in our Intensive English Centre. Some have limited schooling and our classrooms may be their first opportunities to have an education. Our dedicated staff support our students in their transition from the Intensive English Centre (IEC) into mainstream, where they begin their Year 11 and 12 studies.

When I first started at CJSC in 2016 I sought to understand more about how the IEC worked and how I could best serve the students in my role as VET Coordinator. In just three years, through working with Belinda and the student services IEC and mainstream teams, we have trialled several successful models to ensure our students next transition into employment or further training is suitably supported. We have done this through dedicated Foundation English and workplace learning classes, building links with written and spoken communication in both a school and work environment.

The health industry, specifically aged care, has always been a strong career choice for some of our IEC graduates and we have worked hard to bridge the gap for our English as Second Language or Dialect, or EAL/D students, whose written and spoken English is still developing.  Opportunities for our students to gain places in funded courses can be competitive and this has often meant these students have to wait until they complete Year 12 before can begin their vocational training.

Partnership with North Metro

In 2019 we entered into a partnership with North Metro TAFE establishing a dedicated EAL/D class of CJSC students to begin their VET delivered to secondary students training whilst also completing their courses at CJSC.

All 13 students graduated in June 2020 amidst the unpredictable early days of Covid interruptions to education and face to face classes.

These students have recently completed Yr 12 and this cohort meets again on Thursday to begin their higher studies in the health industry, through our new partnership with Amana Living.

Going Beyond the Campus

What makes both of these models work is the CJSC approach to supporting students, not only in the classroom but also through community work placements that allow our students to apply their skills through authentic learning opportunities. We aim to develop further partnerships such as these.

Every single staff member is invested in these students

Our students are supported by our team of teachers, trainers, workplace learning coordinator, IEC teachers and education assistants, our student services team, Deputy Principals and our remarkable Principal, Dr Karen Read. 

They are our future and we are incredibly proud of our programs, team approach and most importantly our students who value education as a privilege.

You will not find a more dedicated school community and students with a phenomenal work ethic and will to succeed.

Our current partnerships include;

  • Aegis Bassendean
  • Amana Living,
  • DADAA
  • Ertech,
  • Garden City Plastics,
  • Plantrite
  • Black Swan State Theatre
  • WA Youth Theatre Company
  • Leeuwin Ocean Adventure Foundation, and
  • the Cities of Bassendean and Stirling.

We hope to work with you in 2021, building strong working relationships in support of our future workforce.

Editors Note:

Thanks Vanessa and staff at Cyril Jackson. Our hearts burst with appreciation for the wonderful work you are all doing. As one student spoke I choked up and reached for a tissue, I glanced around to see EVERYONE at our table was in the same boat!!

Vanessa Buemi

At the end of the morning there were hugs and congratulations all round.

Vanessa has already offered to support teachers at Balcatta SHS by sharing details of how CJ has generated such a great environment for its students. I am sure she would be happy to pass on her wisdom to others.

Keep up to date with the latest career news in Western Australia. Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Bev Johnson

Posted on Leave a comment

What’s the best way to record your micro credentials?

,Do you have a system for recording your professional development?

Craig Hillman from Helena College recommends that teachers record reading the Infocus Careers Newsletter as PD on the WA Teacher Registration Board.  His system has been adopted by a lot of teachers.

I don’t know if unis, TAFE colleges and employment service providers use similar systems to capture their continuous professional learning.

https://favpng.com/

My needs are simple.

I don’t want to track every 2 hour Canva course that I do but I would like to keep a track of career webinars and conferences that I attend.

I would like to be able to record:

  • The name of each event,
  • Key learning from each one,
  • Who delivered the information,
  • Date, time and a URL.

It would be good to be able to colour code different categories of learning so that I can easily see emerging trends.

The trick to finding the best system is to know how you would use it

I would:

  • See what is trending from speakers in Australia and around the world.
  • Attach a copy of the data to job applications if it was able to be seen as a snapshot
  • Go back and check on notes for speeches and articles.

Figure out what functions you want your system to deliver as a first step, then start searching for options that deliver them and compare to see which one is the best fit. Be wary of the biggest and best available as it may do a lot of things that you don’t need.

After doing my simple analysis of what functions I need, I think a simple Excel spreadsheet will do the job.

Become part of the Network of West Australian professionals who are working to deliver the best career guidance in the world. 

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Bev Johnson

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

Posted on Leave a comment

In Focus Careers Teachers’ Guide

This 2021 Teachers’ Guide provides updated links to WA policies, guidelines and services that are identified in the Year 10 Magic Happens Handbook.

They are the shortcuts professionals need to support lessons. There are additional links to lesson ideas that don’t appear in the Handbook. 

It is automatically sent to schools and organisations that subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter. 

I have updated the information from 2020. Sorry, I haven’t managed to make it funny or even faintly amusing in the latest issue!! You will just have to keep reading my newsletter for examples of my sparkling wit!!

If you would like a Word version just email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

I want West Australians to get the best career services in the world.

Check the In Focus Career services here.

If you would like to join the West Australian In Focus Careers network you can register here:

 

Posted on 2 Comments

Year 10 Teachers: Your Magic Happens – 2021 Career Handbook is Out Now

The Year 10 Magic Happens Handbook is out for 2021.

It contains information that directly applies to year 10 students in the Western Australian education system.

If you subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter you will automatically receive your copy so that you can start to plan for 2021. Or you can subscribe now by going HERE.

There are three sections:

Step 1: Finding Your Purpose

Discover what you want to do

This is short but it is the most vital part of the Handbook. If you are trying to cut down on time, don’t skip this bit.

Step 2: Skills for Success

Useful Career Websites

This is the boring, nuts and bolts skills that are essential to getting a job. It includes doing research, finding your aptitudes, time management,resumes, choosing career paths and the paperwork for work experience.

Your resources can be supplemented with the How to Get Authentic Workskills infographic and Be So Good they Can’t Ignore You infographic.

Step 3: Your Success Strategy

Design your best path forward

This is where you get to use your values and knowledge of how to get a job to design your success strategy. It includes setting SMART goals, doing a SWOT and a USED analysis and creating a project plan.

Magic Happens – Year 10 Careers Handbook 2021

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter to get your complimentary copy of this great teaching and personal development resource.

The 2021 Magic Happens Teachers’ Guide is also available to subscribers.

The Magic Happens TO DO List infographic is also available to subscribers.

To keep up to date with West Australian career news and ideas subscribe to my insanely great monthly In Focus Careers Newsletter. Email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Posted on 1 Comment

Be So Good They Can’t Ignore You – Infographic

Career ideas for West Australians.

This infographic supports Step 2 of the Year 10 Magic Happens Handbook.

To subscribe to the insanely great Infocus Careers Newsletter for West Australians email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

 

 

 

 

Posted on 1 Comment

How to Get Employability Skills – Infographic

You can’t get experience if you don’t have a job. You can’t get a job if you don’t have experience.

Employers constantly complain that young workers do not have any idea about how to work. They complain that doing employability skills in a classroom setting does not prepare them for the workplace.

The How to Get Authentic Workskills infographic suggests 5 ways that Year 10 – 12 students can develop employability skills through authentic workplace learning.

Read Are You Nice Enough to Win That Job for more information and tips on how to develop workskills.

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter for monthly updates on what is happening in Western Australia. 

 

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on 1 Comment

Do you know who to call? Career Websites

The number of useful websites keeps growing, so I have updated this Coggle Map. It is useful for career advisors, school leavers and job seekers.

Many of the government sites are duplicate services. You do NOT need to go to each of these sites.  You MAY choose to get frustrated that government departments don’t collaborate!!

Useful Career Websites
Useful Career Websites

You can find the Coggle Map of Useful Sites HERE. I have put links to each of the sites so that you don’t have to look up each one.

If you can’t get in,  email me and I will send you the link: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter

You can save time and improve the quality of career advice you give. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers newsletter that is supported and shared by 100s of West Australians.

Email me for a complimentary copy: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

I just wanted to pass on my appreciation and admiration for the work that you do with this newsletter and your website. Every month, there is something in there that resonates with me on the ‘why’ of our job.

 

 

 

 

Posted on Leave a comment

History Careers Mind Map

Mind Map with links to history careers

The History Careers Mind Map identifies careers supported by the knowledge and skills history students develop.

Download the Mind Map to access the links to the different careers.

The Good Universities Guide

In most cases the links are through to the information provided by the Good Universities Guide Career Ladders. Where information wasn’t available on the Careers Ladders I have added a link to the most useful information I could find.

The Good Universities Guide has uni and VET courses

MyFuture

MyFuture has videos and great information about careers. It may be worth subscribing as all States and Territories contribute to that central store of information. It costs about $15 a year to subscribe.

MyFuture was created by all Australian States and Territories. It is THE most comprehensive career site we have.

In Focus Careers

I wrote a post recently with updated links to all of the key careers sites.

There is a lot of duplication in these sites, particularly in the government ones, so find which ones work best for you.

Please send me a complimentary copy of your insanely great newsletter for West Australian students.

Chief Evangelist for Insanely Great Careers Education in Western Australia.

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

M: 0434056412

Posted on Leave a comment

A Robot Will NOT Take Your Job

No no and no.

  • Robots are NOT taking your jobs.
  • You will NOT spend your life scrambling for 17 jobs in 5 careers.
  • Millenials are NOT more focused on meaningful work than baby boomers.

hand-1571849_1920

The Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) is keen to reduce anxiety by debunking these myths.

On their Making Sense of Career Research webinar they debunked three myths.

Robots are NOT Taking Your Jobs

Bad news travels fast and there is reason to be fearful. There are not many chimney sweeps around… even chimneys are disappearing!!Chimney Sweep canva (2017_09_18 00_22_14 UTC)

But jobs are NOT disappearing. Since the introduction of IT across industries, the amount of work has actually increased.

Machines haven’t REDUCED housework

Laundry

Our behaviour will change because of the machines. Before we had washing machines doing washing was hard, and time consuming. Not it is easy, but still time consuming because we wash our clothes more often.

Houses are cleaner, food is more interesting, we stay awake longer.

Machines have changed the way we live, and there are lots of jobs in our new way of living.

Artificial Intelligence Won’t Replace ALL Workers

If a some sauce is spilt on the floor at McDonalds, it takes a person a second to wipe it up. That task would take very sophisticated AI and it would be slower and more expensive than a human.

The same with self driving vehicles. It takes a lot of AI to account for every possible accident. It is more likely that technology will make us better drivers by helping us to park without crashing, showing us which route to take, or warning us when we are about to run out of fuel.

Where will the jobs be?

  • The Naked Scientist podcast Life in the Year 2100 talks about all the jobs required to create sustainable futures and build smart cities with intelligent buildings. They claim gardeners will be more important as green space makes people physically and mentally healthier.

Future of Work

  • The Future is Human is an optimistic report with lots of practical recommendations for future success. You can see a Press Club presentation on the report by Deloitte economics Chris Richardson, HERE.

You will NOT have 17 jobs in 5 careers

Since 2000 Australian’s have stayed in jobs longer.  We used to stay in jobs for 3 years and now we stay for 4.

It is likely that you will stay in a job for a shorter time at the start of your career, as you work at McDonalds or travel overseas, then stay longer as you go through your career.

On the Making Sense of Research CDAA webinar Jason Brown gave this explanation of how absurd it would be to try to totally change careers and start learning from scratch again.

Future of work jason Brown

You can relax. In 2000 we stayed in jobs for about 3 years, now we stay in jobs for about 4 years.

Millenials are NOT more focused on meaningful work than baby boomers

I was pleased to hear this. I have always sought meaningful work and I’m a baby boomer. Claims that young people are more focused on finding meaningful work than me, seemed to be dismissing my life’s work.

volunteer girl fire fighter

In COVID-19 and careers: On the futility of generational explanations, Cort W. Rudolph, and Hannes Zacher say:

It is common to broadly group people of different ages into “generations” and to speak of distinctions between such groups in terms of “generational differences.” The problem with this practice, is that there exists no credible scientific evidence that (a) generations exist, (b) that people can be reliably classified into generational groups, and (c) that there are demonstrable differences between such groups.

We have already noted an emerging generationalized rhetoric that has characterized how people of different ages have been affected by and reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic. …..We urge researchers to eschew the notion of generations and generational differences and consider alternative lifespan development theoretical frameworks that better capture age-graded processes.

Thanks to career professionals 

It is great to have professionals from the CDAA debunking myths that make us feel bad.

Subscribe to In Focus Careers

If your organisation works with young West Australians you can keep up to speed with what is happening on the careers front by subscribing to my insanely great newsletter.

Join more than 120 schools and organisations that tap into a network of careers experts around the State so that they can deliver the BEST careers information to their students and clients.