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Apprenticeship and Traineeship Words Demystified

Barista Training for Hospitality Industry
WORDMEANING
Advanced Diploma Graduates at this level will have broad knowledge and be highly skilled for work in a vocation. These are high level vocational skills. The knowledge can usually be transferred to academic qualifications like a bachelor’s degree.
Apprenticeships and TraineeshipsApprenticeships tend to be in traditional trades like plumbing. Traineeships are in non-trade areas like business and computing. They both involve:
• a combination of work and study.
• finding an employer who is willing for you to go to college 1 day per week, or in blocks of study a couple of times a year
• getting on the job training
• getting paid a training wage while you get your qualification
Australian Apprenticeship Support Network
(AASN)
The Australian Apprenticeship Support Network (AASN) is your first point of contact for all queries about apprenticeships.
You cannot start an apprenticeship without an AASN provider.
You can find your closest AASN HERE.
Certificate I This is entry level training that gives foundation skills. Anyone who graduates from school will have qualifications above Cert I.
Certificate IIEntry level for many vocational occupations. Graduates of Cert II will have a basic understanding of the job.

Certificate III This is getting into the vocation with much more skill. A licensed electrician has a Cert III and it usually takes 4 years to complete the apprenticeship.
Certificate IV This is getting into management roles. A Cert IV holder will have sound skills in a vocational area AND have enough knowledge of the industry to start exercising sound judgement and solve problems.

CompetencyA competency is a skill you are required to learn. It is made up of an element of competency and performance criteria.

e.g.
• Element Identify workplace communication procedures.
• Performance Criteria Identify appropriate lines of communication with supervisors and colleagues
Competent For each unit of competency, you will be assessed and you will need to demonstrate that you can do the skill. To be competent means that you can do the specific skill that is required in the workplace.
Competency A competency is a skill you are required to learn. It is made up of an element of competency and performance criteria.

e.g.
• Element Identify workplace communication procedures.
• Performance Criteria Identify appropriate lines of communication with supervisors and colleagues.
Diploma Diplomas demonstrate high level of specialised vocational knowledge and skills in an industry. Workers may choose to study a diploma in order to gain management skills for a vocation. The high level of competence of diploma holders is often recognised by universities which award credit for study in a degree program. The degree will focus more on theory.

Group Training Organisation Group Training Organisations (RTO) are employers of apprentices and trainees.
Their role is to coordinate a group of small businesses who can employ an apprentice plumber for example for one day per week. Some big organisations now use an RTO to organize their apprentices for them.
Pre-apprenticeship A pre-apprenticeship is a Certificate II program that includes a period of workplace experience coordinated by a Registered Training Provider. The aim is to provide you with industry specific training, combined with adequate time in a real workplace to gain skills, knowledge and behaviours to enable transition into a full apprenticeship.

A pre apprenticeship is often a pathway to an apprenticeship as employers call lecturers and ask them to recommend a good student to employ.
TIPS for getting a pre-apprenticeship:
When applying for a pre-apprenticeship you may need to do an interview.
• Take along photos of your work in a portfolio to impress the interview panel.
• Dress in the sort of clothes they would wear to work, office clothes for an office job, and smart casual for a building trade.
• Sporting and volunteer experience as well as school results and industry experience will help to impress the panel.

Places in pre-apprenticeships are usually limited so you should prepare well for the interview.
RPL Recognition of Prior Learning. You can apply to have skills you learned in the workplace recognised in order to get a qualification.
RTO Registered Training Organisation. A college that is registered by government to deliver registered vocational training.
SPOLState Priority Occupation List. This list shows government where there will be skills shortages and therefore where it should give the greatest subsidies for courses. SPOL courses will be less expensive and there will be higher demand for skilled workers.
TAFETAFE colleges are government run organisations.
Technical and Further Education – This often gets used to describe training after school that is not uni. You may also hear the word “tech” used in the same way.
UnitA course is made up of a number of units. A unit is a block of skills or competencies grouped together within a course.
VETVocational Education and Training. This is often used by people in the training industry.
Students would probably say they are doing a “TAFE” course rather than doing a “VET” course.

To find out more about VET go to:

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers News for West Australian schools

I come across careers information for adults every month as I am putting together the In Focus Careers News for schools. I have collated it in this monthly supplement because so many people have no idea what is available or where to start looking.

I hope it helps you to create a better life for yourself.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

I come across careers information for adults every month as I am putting together the In Focus Careers News for schools. I have collated it in this monthly supplement because so many people have no idea what is available or where to start looking.

I hope it helps you to create a better life for yourself.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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It’s Career Expo Time Again – Get tips on how to get the most from your visit

Tip 1: Don’t sign ANYTHING.

The Careers Expo is great fun. There are happy, smiling people. There are glossy brochures and beautiful displays. People on the stands are friendly and helpful. Of course they are! They are professionals. You aren’t going to buy something from someone who isn’t nice.

Many visitors sign up for thousands of dollars worth of training based on a noisy 5 minute discussion in the crowded Convention Centre.

The Expos are a prime marketing place for all education and training organisation. They spend a lot of money on their displays and get their best, nicest, most professional sales people to tell you about their courses.

Tip 1:

Don’t sign ANYTHING.

STEP 2:

Know that the biggest displays, those closest to the entry doors, and the most professional looking displays have spent the most money on trying to sell to you.

STEP 3:

Check out the list of Exhibitors. 

Some are pure information, like the WA Police Force, Construction Training Fund, WA Department of Education – Teaching and Defence Force Recruiting. Others have courses they would like you to know about.

If you are interested in having a Gap Year check out which exhibitors will have information that will interest you. If you are interested in Trades, check out the ones that you must visit.

https://www.careers-expo.com.au/visitors/exhibitor-list-floor-plan

Make the decision about which ones to visit before you get sucked in by the bright lights and music!

STEP 4:

Figure out three questions to ask exhibitor one before you meet with them. Make sure one of your questions is about price if they are selling courses.

Don’t be surprised if they don’t want to answer you about. You may get answers like “It depends on…… ” and “We have a great loan to cover your costs”.

You could also ask….

  • How much will it cost?
  • How long the course will take.
  • What are the entry requirements.
  • For contacts with current students.
  • What successful students are like.
  • Do they have a mid year intake.
  • If they have links with industry that provides work placement.
  • How long it takes their graduates to get a job in the industry.
  • What sort of work graduates get.

STEP 5 – FINAL STEP

Go to see your career advisor to discuss what you have discovered.

If you don’t know a career advisor go to a Jobs and Skills Centre and talk with them. Its FREE. The Jobs and Skills Centres are based in TAFE colleges but they also have information about unis.

Go back to the places you are interested in. You will end up paying a lot for your course. This is probably the first BIG thing you have ever bought. Make sure you are buying something that is perfect for you.

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers News for West Australian schools

Testimonial:

Thanks for the latest newsletter Bev, and for all the information and inspiring ideas over the year. Since I have become a part of  the (In Focus Careers) network I have grown in knowledge and motivation to really make a difference for our young people. 

(South West Regional Government High School.)

I come across careers information for adults every month as I am putting together the In Focus Careers News for schools. I have collated it in this monthly supplement because so many people have no idea what is available or where to start looking.

I hope it helps you to create a better life for yourself.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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Commonwealth Missing the Mark on Future VET Plans

group of people sitting on chair in front of wooden table inside white painted room

If the government thought its review of the VET system was going to:

 address some of the key obstacles in lifelong learning 

it misses the mark.  

When I read “Productivity Commission” I think “cost cutting” and that is precisely what I read in this Productivity Commission review

The recommendations are for cost shifting to a user pays system which will INTRODUCE obstacles to lifelong learning. 

As well as shifting from a government pays system, they move away from supporting TAFE delivery again.

You don’t need to have a long memory to recall how this has worked in the past with cheap to deliver courses being taken up by private training providers while expensive, workshop intensive courses were starved for funds in the TAFE system. 

The long term impact on skills delivered via the VET system has resulted in a skills shortage now that we can’t import skilled tradies and technical experts from overseas.

The National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development is the framework for intergovernmental collaboration in VET. After ignoring VET for years the government thought it was time to check out what is happening. It asked the Productivity Commission to do a review.

Key pointsBev’s Comments
The National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development is overdue for replacement.– Governments have stepped back from some of its policy aspirations. Targets have not been met and the performance framework has not held governments to account.The Framework hasn’t been actively managed since the Coalition came to power in 2013 when it no longer saw VET as a priority.Little wonder the Framework overdue for replacement.  
• A new intergovernmental agreement should be principles-based, modular (to retain flexibility and currency) and reviewed every five years. – Australian Government funding should remain largely untied for base funding but subject to much greater accountability and transparency. ·        contestability in VET markets, with a provider-agnostic approach to training deliveryThis is good new for private RTOs. Check P11 for the Principles  which give lots of emphasis to measurement and reporting and not much about how to support quality VET.
• Governments should continue to support the development of a more efficient and competitive VET market through informed user choice and a focus on quality.– Students need better curated information on career opportunities, the performance of training providers, course quality and prices. – Efforts to improve quality should be ramped up through faster changes to training packages, developing an evidence-based VET workforce strategy, and a phased introduction of independent assessment. “Informed user choice” could be a great thing given the lack of information around VET in WA. “Faster changes to training packages” is good. Industry complains about skills training not keeping up with industry.“Independent assessment” should hold to account some of the shonky providers.
• There is a manifest capacity for governments to achieve a better return on the $6.4 billion spent on VET by:– using the efficient costs and loadings currently being estimated by the National Skills Commission as a common basis for setting and simplifying course subsidies– introducing modest minimum student fees for Certificate III and above courses with exemptions for disadvantaged students– applying more contestability and transparency to public funding of TAFEs and enhancing the operational autonomy of public providers   – enabling State and Territory funding to follow students enrolled with an interstate provider.More collaboration between parties that smooth the transition from school could deliver a more efficient outcome. See Cyril Jackson’s Partnership Model.–        I like WA’s course subsidy model that favors training for industries where there are skills shortages. –        No. No. No. If we want an economy that keeps up with changes in industry, we must ditch this user pays model. –        Contestability of public funding of TAFEs led to the demise of expensive, high tech, “state of the art” training. The priority became making money rather than investing in emerging technologies.  –        I don’t know how happy WA taxpayers will be with this.
• To scale up workforce skills, governments should expand VET Student Loans (VSL) to more Diploma and above courses and to most Certificate IV courses. – Loan caps should better reflect course costs, and loan fees should be paid by all students.  –        Charging people who are trying to keep up with high end and rapid changes in their industry is an interesting concept in a smart economy!! –        I think this policy is the wrong way around. To incentivize workers gaining high level skills in a changing economy, Certificate IV and Diploma courses should be heavily subsidized. 
• Reforms to the trade apprenticeship system are best focused on:– improving completion rates by better screening and matching of prospective apprentices– making pathways more flexible and providing the same subsidy for non-apprenticeship pathways as for traditional pathways– adjusting the timing of employer incentives to provide more support when the risk of cancellation is greatest See my earlier suggestion on the Cyril Jackson Partnership Model. Better informed students make better decisions.    The Role of Good Practices in Youth Employment may be a good place to start putting some responsibility on employers. 
• There should be a coordinated national strategy to improve school education, ‘second-chance’ learning in the VET sector and other adult education services to reduce the large number of Australians with low language, literacy, numeracy and digital literacy skills.  At last, something positive!
• To address some of the key obstacles to lifelong learning, this report proposes improvements in foundation skills, better credit pathways, an expansion of VSL and a trial of a new financing instrument for mature-age Australians reskilling and upskillingI don’t think this strategy will achieve this aim.

You can read the Review HERE

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Leaving School in WA? You can get free career help

If you have just left Year 12 and don’t know what to do next year, there is free, expert advice available to help you to come out of your cocoon and turn into a butterfly.

Maybe Uni?

If you THINK you might go to uni but don’t know what to do, check out the Alternative Pathways to Uni.

Most of these courses are free and while you are doing them you learn how to do research, write assignments and you find out about different courses.

  1. Check out the different WA alternative pathways,
  2. Pick your uni and enrol in 4 week or one semester course
  3. Work with career advisors while you are at the uni.

Check out Which University is Best for You

Maybe TAFE?

The range of careers through TAFE is too great to mention. A VET course can get you into the high demand cyber security industry or into a specialist health career without getting a degree. There are also apprenticeships and traineeships that you expect to get from TAFE. See:

Entry to pre-apprenticeships at 15

How to blitz your apprenticeship interview

This is how you get an apprenticeship in WA

Go to a Jobs and Skills Centre which is probably on the same campus as your local TAFE. They have diagnostic tools that will help them to point you in the right direction.

Lots of TAFE courses are free or low cost in 2021.

Still Lost?

Check out the wonderful MyFuture site. There are terrific quizzes there that will help to set you off in the right direction.

West Australians can get the best career support in the world

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers News for West Australian schools

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Please send me a complimentary copy of your insanely great newsletter.

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How to Blitz Your Apprenticeship Interview

This could be your big chance to blitz an apprenticeship interview.

  • Skilled migration has stopped,
  • Apprenticeship subsidies are high,
  • Building grants are generous, causing a building boom
  • Employers are looking for enthusiastic people to take up their jobs.

Therefore, your chances of winning a job are high.

Make sure you don’t miss this window by blowing your interview.

Do you shake hands now?

WA has so little spread of COVID that you can shake hands if you get to the interview stage. However, carry hand sanitizer and use it straight after the interview. Also, make sure you don’t have a pathetic handshake! A wimpy handshake is pathetic but a bone crusher is weird.

Have a firm handshake. Apart from having a decent handshake look at the person, say “Hi. Good to meet you” and smile.

Handshake

Give the employer the right gut feeling

Check this video.

It gives tips on how to give your potential employers a good gut feeling.

If you have a good written application the employer will start off with the feeling that you are going to be good. School leavers can get tips on how to write a good resume and cover letter HERE at Youth Central.

How to get an apprenticeship 1

Dress like the employer

Neat casual will probably suit most apprenticeships. Don’t wear a suit. Your employer won’t be wearing a suit.

More Tips

Finding an apprenticeship

  • An apprenticeship is a job. You can find apprenticeships through family and friends, on sites like Seek.com.au, through a career advisor, a Jobs and Skills Centre or via a pre-apprenticeship.
  • Check the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Pathways site.
  • Getting a job as a trades assistant can help you to get a foot in the door.

Making a good impression

  • Employers like applicants who have done volunteer or part time work as it showed their enthusiasm and meant they would have some work ready skills.
  • Work experience in the field looks good on a resume.
  • Good school results, particularly in metals, maths and engineering are indicators that you might be a good apprentice in a building trade. Taking a folio of photos of projects you have worked on is a good idea.

Get your driver’s license

  • A driver’s license is important for most apprenticeships. Start working towards your driver’s license as soon as you turn 16.

At the end of the interview say you really want this apprenticeship.

(Know what to say if they ask why!)

Women in Trades

Only 1-3% of tradespeople are women. Opportunities to earn the big money during mining and building booms are largely given to men while women are directed into low paid caring jobs in the aged, child and disability sectors.

Women and girls interested in trades may find the Programmed National Energy Technician Training Scheme worth applying through. In 2019 they had 38% females in their trades program. Programmed smaller

Here are some companies that are looking for apprentices.

Check the Jobs and Skills Centre Job Board. 

Check out this story from the ABC to get some background to supporting women in trades.

Australian Apprenticeship Pathways has a range of information on how to get an apprenticeship.

See the National Association of Women in Construction

Steps to apprenticeship

In Focus Careers Newsletter

If you go to a school in Western Australia it probably subscribes to the In Focus Careers Newsletter. You can check, and get a complimentary copy here.

Testimonial

I have found your material invaluable.  The information you have put together is thorough – a one-stop-shop in a sea of information that is out there.  I have utilised this information on a regular basis with others throughout the school.

(South Metropolitan Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian careers teachers and students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

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EVERYONE is looking for apprentices

Apprenticeships

The big story for tradies for 2021 is that everyone is looking for apprentices. There is a construction bubble happening.

Tips for Girls 

If you want to go into a building trade the job prospects are great, the pay is a whole lot better than aged or child care and you have opportunities to go into design, running your own business or project management.

If you would like working in building trades start looking at the big companies first. They are the ones with systems in place that reduce sexism and they try to make workplaces fair.

The National Association of Women in Construction provides support to women employees and to employers who take on a woman.

Check out the companies on their site, that are working with them and create a shortlist of which companies would be best to work for.

Help to find a job in construction for women.

If you Hate School

Students who hate school might want to try their luck at getting an apprenticeship while the employer subsidies are available and the building industry is booming.

You are allowed to leave school early if you go into a job or into training. An apprenticeship is a job WITH training.

Become part of the Network of West Australian professionals who are working to deliver the best career guidance in the world. 

Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Bev Johnson

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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The In Focus Careers Newsletter Rocks

If you subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter you know how much work I put into it. I am sometimes surprised when I meet someone at a workshop or conference who mentions something I have written.

I feel like I am working away in my cave and no one is listening.

IMG_1426

Rebecca Herbertson, WA President of the CDAA wanted me to go for one of the National Careers Partnership Grants to have my newsletter developed for each State/Territory collating information just for that jurisdiction.

You need to be a little obsessed, a lot passionate and a tad parochial if you want to do what I do, so I don’t think it is a goer nationally.

Rebecca wrote this testimonial in support of her idea … and I am so glad she did.

Testimonial

The In Focus Monthly Careers Newsletter is a curated collection of current scholarships, career programs, important dates, Career Expos and events, career research and resources.

While aimed at the secondary school practitioner in WA, I find it incredibly valuable as a Careers Educator in the VET sector.

Having a trusted source of timely information means that parents, students, job seekers and career development practitioners have an up to date reliable resource telling what is out there, all in the one place. Prior to subscribing to the In Focus Careers Newsletter I would only discover resources or opportunities by accident, or through time consuming research.

Having this resource at a National level could address one of the biggest issues we have in Careers in Australia; recreating the wheel over and over because we don’t know about something that already exists.

There is currently no universally recognised system for distributing careers information or for advertising programs and events, which reaches everyone who would be genuinely interested and find it helpful.

The reinvention of the wheel can be seen in the plethora of websites which contain the same or similar information all funded by Governments, such as Jobs and Skills WA, MyFuture, Job Outlook and Job Jumpstart.

A National Resource, with a similar format of the In Focus Careers Newsletter, which was published monthly, and distributed through all schools, job actives, DES providers, TAFEs and organisations like The Smith Family across the nation, would be amazing.

Of course such a resource would need a team headed by someone like Bev Johnson, curator of the In Focus Career Resources Hub, who has the careers expertise, knowledge and energy required to put together such a well-researched publication. Without Bev’s passion, networking, and career expertise, such a resource would be likely to miss the mark.

Rebecca Herbertson,

WA Divisional President – Career Development Association of Australia

Director of Training and Compliance for the Betterlink Group – a private RTO specialising in Careers and Employment Training to the sector.

super synthesizer Thanks Rebecca, from Bev XXX

 

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What is the Difference? TAFE v Uni

Apprenticeships are the main things we know that TAFE delivers.

If you want to be a mechanic or electrician, you get an apprenticeship and go to TAFE.

But what about computer technicians, house designers, tourism operators,  agriculture and aged care workers?

Collage

There are hundreds of jobs you can get with a TAFE qualification.

Do I need a qualification AT ALL after leaving school??

Yes….. The bottom line is that you NEED a post school qualification if you are not to take a pathway to poverty.

Statistics 1

Employers pay for knowledge and skills, but:

  • people who have a Certificate III or IV have about the same unemployment rate as people who have a degree.
  • people who have a TAFE qualification earn about the same as people who get degrees. 

Statistics 4

(Statistics from Ivan Neville, Labour Market Research and Analysis, Dept of Labour)

Spot the Difference

Guess which Fashion Course is run at Curtin and which one is run at  TAFE?

You’ll focus on the relationship between garment and body, using a theoretical and contextual framework for understanding the cultural significance and practice of fashion design and global trends.

You’ll learn the principles of design and creative studio practice; and develop skills in fabric manipulation and construction, design, pattern-making, styling and fashion illustration.

Study the enterprise skills to work in fashion business.  Computer Aided Design (CAD) patternmaking, grading and illustration facilities, world class fashion design and textile forecasting resources, over 80 specialised industrial sewing machines, and a staff of fashion industry specialists, are key to our successes with our industry relevant courses, graduate employment outcomes and recognition in the sector.

It is easy to see that the one that mentions theory is a uni course while the one that focuses on CAD and pattern making has a more practical focus.

Length of Course

TAFE

An qualified electrician (Certificate III) takes about 4 years to get their license.

A barista takes about a week to get a piece of paper saying they have a set of skills (skills set) rather than a full qualification as a chef. A course on using farm chemicals safely may take a day and you don’t need to be a qualified farmer to do the course.

The focus of the courses is always on providing the skills that industry needs for a particular purpose.

Lots of TAFE courses give you credits at university. A Diploma of Work Health and Safety takes a year to complete and you will get between 6 months and a year’s credit for the Diploma if you do a degree.

Uni

A Bachelor of Science (Health, Safety and Environment) takes three years.

Cost per Course

TAFE

The maximum fee for the one year Diploma of Work Health and Safety is $2,848.50 which included tuition and resources that you may have to purchase.

TAFE Subsidies

If you do a course where there is a West Australian skills shortage, like cyber security, aged care or agriculture , your fees will be heavily subsidised by the State government.

Uni

The tuition fee for the three year Bachelor of Science degree is $8,460 (Roughly $1000/unit)

There are many scholarships available for university students.

TAFE is More Like School

When you go to TAFE you will probably go into a class of less than 25 students, a lot like a schoolroom or workshop designed to replicate what you will find in the workplace. Some TAFE courses are done entirely in the workplace. Some courses also have a significant theory component – Occupational health and safety, for example, has a lot of chemistry in the course. Veterinary nursing includes anatomy and physiology.

Uni has more Theory

Lectures are a routine teaching methodology at university. You may be in a group of 400 students in a lecture theatre as you are given information by an expert in their field. You are required to do reading on the subject BEFORE you go into the lecture. The subject of your lecture will be followed up by a tutorial or practical workshop on the subject where you can ask questions and gain more in depth knowledge.

Bev Johnson

Bev.Johnson

Email me for a FREE discussion about your options for next year. Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

If you would like to unearth your path to meaningful education or employment through online counselling to email me: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter

The In Focus Careers newsletter is the only one designed to keep  teachers, students and their families up to speed with West Australian career opportunities.

West Australian teachers save hours of work by subscribing and are confident that they have the information they need to provide professional career advice to their students.

Subscribe: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Year 12 – WHAT NEXT?

If you were hanging out for a flash of inspiration at a uni open day, careers expo or information session… WHAT DO YOU DO NOW??

Year 12s have never had it tougher when it comes to deciding what to do next.

While this is the first time year 12s will leave school, there are experts around who WANT to help you.

This simple summary of the support and main choices available to West Australian school leavers will help you to clarify your decision.

Year 12 What Next?

Uni or TAFE Spot the Difference

Many year 12 students don’t really understand the difference between uni and TAFE.

Guess which fashion course is at Curtin University and which is at South Metropolitan TAFE.

In this (course) you will focus on the relationship between garment and body, using a theoretical and contextual framework for understanding national and international trends and the cultural significance and practice of fashion design. In our course you’ll learn how to produce a unique range of garments and accessories for the marketplace. You’ll gain fashion illustration and drawing skills and learn about digital design, pattern making and garment construction.

If you thought the first one was Curtin you are right. University has a more theoretical approach to learning while TAFE has a more practical focus. Pick the learning style that suits you best for next year.

Career Advice – Take action while all is quiet

The offices of university career advisors have gone quiet. The staff at Jobs and Skills Centres thought they would be run off their feet… but all is quiet there too.

If you are not clear about what to do in 2021 there has never been a better time to tap into the undivided attention of normally busy staff.

  • Jobs and Skills Centres aren’t just about TAFE. You can do aptitude tests to see what direction would suit you, you can get help with different uni and VET courses, they have a jobs board and you can get help with job application and interview skills. And the help is free.
  • Each Western Australian university  free career counselling. You are under no obligation to enrol at the place where you get your counselling although your counsellor will know more about the university they are working for.
  • See your school career counsellor. There is no one better placed. They know you. They can talk to your teachers and your parents. They get the full picture and will be able to point you in a good direction.
  • You can always come to me for an online (and on phone) consultation. (Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au) I have just started to do this with students online during the lockdown and it is great fun.

Youth Allowance and Scholarships

Your decision to study may depend on finances. If you are 18 – 24 and you have supported yourself for 18 months you MAY qualify for Youth Allowance.

Check the Youth Allowance site to see if there are any benefits that you are eligible for. There is an Ask for Help button which could save you hours trying to get through on the phone. If you need to leave home to study don’t forget to ask about travel allowance.

Also check for financial assistance on the Good Universities Guide site HERE.

There are scholarships for so many purposes, not just academic excellence and they are often only available when you start university or TAFE. Search online for scholarships in your field.  The Good Universities Guide tries to capture most scholarships on its site.

Ask your career advisor for help searching for scholarships.

Uni Pathway

Very few people have a clear idea of what they want to do at university. If you want to go to uni but are not exactly sure what course or subjects to take, apply the same thinking you used in Year 10 when choosing WACE subjects to keep your opportunities open.

  • Talk to your school career counsellor about what course to apply for and subjects to take.
  • Go to see a career planner at one or two universities to clarify what course and subjects you wish to take.
  • Decide on your top choices.
  • Apply to your chosen university either via TISC or via Notre Dame or your chosen university.

Unsure about Uni for Next Year

If you MIGHT want to go to uni in APPLY through TISC. If you get offered a place you can accept and DEFER for a year.

  • Read Is the Uni Bus Right for You?
  • See a career planner.
  • Apply for a course at your chosen university via the normal TISC or direct application process
  • When you get an offer contact your university to hold your offer and defer it for a year.

Alternative Pathway to Uni

If you want to go to uni but don’t get the required ATAR score there are many alternative pathways you can take.

Some universities will consider your current scores if you have a year between leaving school and starting university. They consider that the break can result in you gaining maturity that will help you to succeed at university.

  • Contact me and I will send the latest WA information on alternative pathways at all WA universities including TAFE colleges.
  • See a career planner at the university or training college of your choice.
  • Decide on your best option.
  • Apply for the alternative pathway of your choice.

TAFE Course

If you are clear about what TAFE course you want to take contact your chosen college to enrol in September.

  • Talk to your school career counsellor about what course to apply for and subjects to take.
  • Check out North Metro TAFE courses HERE and South Metro TAFE courses HERE
  • Go to see a career counsellor at TAFE to clarify what course and subjects you wish to take. Ask the counsellor to advise you about courses that are subsidised by government because of skills shortages. These courses are on the State Priority Occupation List (SPOL) and are cheaper than many other courses.
  • Decide which course to enrol in.
  • Apply for a place in your chosen course. Check the college website for online applications.

Apprenticeships and Traineeships

Getting an apprenticeship or traineeship is like getting a job.

  • Get the apprentice job search app here. That will help you to find your local Group Training Provider in WA.
  • Get help from your school career advisor to prepare your CV ready for job applications.
  • Get references from school before you leave and get copies of them. Get the correct title and contact details of those at school who give you a reference.
  • Ask your family and friends if they know of any apprentice opportunities.
  • Search for apprenticeship opportunities on sites like Indeed, Jora and Seek.
  • Ask your local TAFE if they have any pre apprenticeship programs. They can be tricky to get into as demand is always high. Employers often contact their local TAFE to find a good employee to take on as an apprentice.

Gap Year

The Victorian Government provides free unbiased advice about taking a Gap Year HERE.

Job Hunting

The Jobs and Skills Centres will help you to improve your resume and will even help you to improve your interview skills. You can find jobs there on their Jobs Board.

I found these tips on writing a job application in a crowded market.

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When you subscribe you join a network of careers experts from across Western Australia who share information that helps teachers, students and families.

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au of M: 043456412.

 

 

 

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Go to TAFE NOW! 15 – 17 year olds

15 – 17 year old students can go to TAFE full time. The State government guarantee 12 years of education for West Australian students. You can go to TAFE or school until the end of the year in which you turn 17.

School aged students get significantly cheaper course fees:

TAFE Fees 2020

The capped fees are available across Western Australia.

Contact your local TAFE college or Jobs and Skills Centre to find what courses are available.

See How to Leave School Early Guide

Join the In Focus Careers Network

In Focus Careers Network  supports members as we create a rich  resource of careers information and advice for West Australian school students.

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Network to:

  • Get the latest news careers news for students, families and teachers.
  • Get resources designed for West Australians.
  • Become careers experts with links to the latest research, new teaching resources and PD opportunities, and
  • Plan the school career calendar using the Monthly Calendar of Events.