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How to Blitz Your Apprenticeship Interview

This could be your big chance to blitz an apprenticeship interview.

  • Skilled migration has stopped,
  • Apprenticeship subsidies are high,
  • Building grants are generous, causing a building boom
  • Employers are looking for enthusiastic people to take up their jobs.

Therefore, your chances of winning a job are high.

Make sure you don’t miss this window by blowing your interview.

Do you shake hands now?

WA has so little spread of COVID that you can shake hands if you get to the interview stage. However, carry hand sanitizer and use it straight after the interview. Also, make sure you don’t have a pathetic handshake! A wimpy handshake is pathetic but a bone crusher is weird.

Have a firm handshake. Apart from having a decent handshake look at the person, say “Hi. Good to meet you” and smile.

Handshake

Give the employer the right gut feeling

Check this video.

It gives tips on how to give your potential employers a good gut feeling.

If you have a good written application the employer will start off with the feeling that you are going to be good. School leavers can get tips on how to write a good resume and cover letter HERE at Youth Central.

How to get an apprenticeship 1

Dress like the employer

Neat casual will probably suit most apprenticeships. Don’t wear a suit. Your employer won’t be wearing a suit.

More Tips

Finding an apprenticeship

  • An apprenticeship is a job. You can find apprenticeships through family and friends, on sites like Seek.com.au, through a career advisor, a Jobs and Skills Centre or via a pre-apprenticeship.
  • Check the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Pathways site.
  • Getting a job as a trades assistant can help you to get a foot in the door.

Making a good impression

  • Employers like applicants who have done volunteer or part time work as it showed their enthusiasm and meant they would have some work ready skills.
  • Work experience in the field looks good on a resume.
  • Good school results, particularly in metals, maths and engineering are indicators that you might be a good apprentice in a building trade. Taking a folio of photos of projects you have worked on is a good idea.

Get your driver’s license

  • A driver’s license is important for most apprenticeships. Start working towards your driver’s license as soon as you turn 16.

At the end of the interview say you really want this apprenticeship.

(Know what to say if they ask why!)

Women in Trades

Only 1-3% of tradespeople are women. Opportunities to earn the big money during mining and building booms are largely given to men while women are directed into low paid caring jobs in the aged, child and disability sectors.

Women and girls interested in trades may find the Programmed National Energy Technician Training Scheme worth applying through. In 2019 they had 38% females in their trades program. Programmed smaller

Here are some companies that are looking for apprentices.

Check the Jobs and Skills Centre Job Board. 

Check out this story from the ABC to get some background to supporting women in trades.

Australian Apprenticeship Pathways has a range of information on how to get an apprenticeship.

See the National Association of Women in Construction

Steps to apprenticeship

In Focus Careers Newsletter

If you go to a school in Western Australia it probably subscribes to the In Focus Careers Newsletter. You can check, and get a complimentary copy here.

Testimonial

I have found your material invaluable.  The information you have put together is thorough – a one-stop-shop in a sea of information that is out there.  I have utilised this information on a regular basis with others throughout the school.

(South Metropolitan Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian careers teachers and students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 


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Are You Nice Enough to Win That Job?

Are you the smartest kid on the block?

It doesn’t matter how smart you are, if you come across as rude, lazy… or just not interested, you will not get the job.

I have employed people because they are “nice” over applicants with higher qualifications who clearly thought they were too good for the job I was offering.

Speak to any employer and they will tell you that they want workers who they can get along with.  They also want them to turn up, on time, today AND tomorrow and be enthusiastic.

ESSENTIAL EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS to WIN THAT JOB

  • Interpersonal and people skills (being nice)
  • Communication and teamwork skills (getting along with the team)
  • Adaptability and resilience (willing to help out and change direction when things are tough)

Digital literacy, critical thinking and problem solving are way down on the list behind these attributes of a great employee.

In her Building Back Better interview on the ABC program, The Money Lisa Fowkes says employers want employees who know how to work. They don’t want kids who have a Certificate II in employability skills.

There is no substitute for the authentic experience of going to work, learning to work with other people, learning to work towards a concrete outcome.

Ivan Neville, from the Department of Labour Market Statistics and Analysis also made this point in his How Young People Can Prepare for the Future of Work

PART TIME WORK GIVES AUTHENTIC EXPERIENCE 

If you are 18 you are probably out of luck at McDonalds as they like to employ younger workers and train them up so that they are ready to take on management responsibilities at 18.

 

Big retail outlets like Bunnings and jbhifi are booming during COVID so you may have more luck there.

Look on the usual job sites like Seek and Indeed, and also look on Facebook pages like Perth Jobs. These Facebook pages are free to advertise on so many employers are going there with their job ads.

Many outlets, like your local IGA, will ask you to fill out a standard form.

Make sure:

  • They can read your writing.
  • Your phone number is clear.
  • Your email is NOT CutiefromCottesloe@gmail.com or LazyGuyinBroome@hotmail.com

Many employers will Google you before they offer you a job so clean up your digital profile.

Your Resume is Your Pitch, You Don’t Tell Your Life Story to Win a Job

If you have never written a job application or covering letter go to Youth Central for advice.

WORK EXPERIENCE IS BRIEF, BUT AUTHENTIC

Students usually have the opportunity to do work experience in Year 10, and later if they choose the right courses.

Try to impress

If you get a good employer and if luck is on your side, your work experience could lead to a part time job. You should at least be able to get a reference or have them say they are willing to give you a phone reference if you are going for a job.

The State Government has developed a Work Placement Register of government departments willing to take on students from government schools.

Tip

The trick with work experience is that school insurance doesn’t cover you if the experience is not part of a school program. If you get an opportunity to do work experience outside of a school program, go to see your careers advisor or year coordinator to see if they can organise insurance for you.

MENTORS, SPONSORS AND COACHES (Stand on the Shoulders of Giants)

PLEASE see your career advisor or year coordinator and ask if they can help you to get a mentor.

Mentors are priceless. They often work with you for about 3 months. If you are nice (see Interpersonal and People Skills above) they may continue to help you after the formal mentoring has ended.

Mentors can help you to develop employability skills.

There are mentoring programs like those run by the Beacon Foundation  and the Australian Business and Community Network. Sometimes a school alumni will run a program for the school. Organisations like Rotary and local business networks may be willing to run them.

If you can’t find a mentor and you live in WA, email me. I will find one for you. Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

SPORTS, CLUBS, RELIGIOUS & CULTURAL GROUPS

Coach a junior sport team, lead a youth group, help to organise Chinese New Year celebrations. All of these experiences add credibility to your resume. They also help you to build your network. The benefit here is that people in your clubs and community groups have probably known you for years and they know your family. They will be happy to give you a reference and may even have a job opportunity for you.

 

Check It’s Who you Know that Counts  to discover how to make the most of your networks.

VOLUNTEERING

The great thing about volunteering is that you can try lots of different jobs. Three months of volunteering should be enough to make a good impression and learn if you are interested in that industry.

You can find volunteering suggestions HERE  or email me for a copy so that you get the live links Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au .  You can find volunteer opportunities on the Seek site, just look for the Volunteering tap at the top. A Google search for volunteer opportunities in your suburb or area will also give you suggestions.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Running your own business will give you heaps of work skills.

It doesn’t have to be a million dollar business. I know young people who run a babysitting club. A friend’s daughter set up an office cleaning business while at uni. My garden needs weeding and I can’t find anyone to do it.

Don’t muck around with this. Remember that your goal is to learn, not just to make some small change.

Go to the Small Business Development Corporation site. It gives heaps of free advice on how to start your business. You can go in and get advice in a face to face meeting.

Once you have left school you can enrol in the NEIS Scheme program that will assist you to set up your business.

Contact me if you would like a complimentary 15 minute career discussion Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

Subscribe to my Insanely Great In Focus Careers Newsletter to discover career ideas that matter

Bev.j@infocus-Careers.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Leaving Year 12 – Do these things now

You have to leave school at the end of year 12. Hanging around would be creepy.

Create an Interview Folio

Stressed Frog Cover

Put COPIES of your stuff in your folio and put the original in a safe place.

You folio can have:

  • Your resume/CV Youth Central provides tips for school students. Remember, your resume is not your life story, it is your pitch to a potential employer.
  • Your application for the job/scholarship/course you are going for. You can get help from a Jobs and Skills Centre to do this.
  • References from teachers, coaches, mentors
  • Photos of prizes you have won
  • Reports
  • Certificates
  • Creative work (photos of you working on a car, building something, doing community service, art, cooking)
  • Anything else you can think of that will show you in a good light.

Get Interview Skills

Go to a Jobs and Skills Centre free Interview Skills course.

Driver’s Licence

To get many jobs in Western Australia you need a driver’s licence. If you haven’t started to get one, start now. Go to this site to get started.

Tax File Number

If you want to get paid employment you will need a Tax File Number. You can apply HERE.

Bank Account

If you haven’t got a bank account, you will need one. Go to the MoneySmart site to get financial advice on how to manage money now that it is largely invisible. That site also has a budget planner.

Barefoot investor

The Barefoot Investor guy says NEVER get a credit card.

Build your online profile

If you are not visible you will not be noticed. You need to be connected, visible and credible. See It’s Who You Know That Counts. 

Join online groups. Work your LinkedIn profile.

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter to know about careers in Western Australia

Capture

If you need help to prepare for 2021, email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

 


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It’s Who You Know that Counts. These tips help you to network like a pro.

If there is a job going in our business, we will give it to a family member first.

Grandfather and granddaughterIf no one in our family wants it, we will check our friends or our friends’ kids.

We give jobs to people we know. It’s always been like that.

Most jobs don’t get advertised. We give jobs to family and friends, or friends of friends. If we can’t find someone through our network and have to advertise, we will try to find someone who is like us.

Five tips that will help you to network your way into a job. 

1. Don’t be phony

Australians hate crawlers. We hate people who try to be your friend just for what they can get from you.

Stick to your values and be true to yourself first.  If people don’t like the real you, it isn’t worth trying to be someone you are not.

Check Are You Living Your Best Possible Life to make sure you are on the right track.

2. Be Nice

Sir Richard Branson is one of the richest guys in the world and everyone loves him.

He is always smiling.

I bet he isn’t always happy, or nice, but most of us don’t see that. Everyone wants him on their team. He is fun. I want to know him.

Be nice, smile.

richard branson

3. Be Seen

If people haven’t seen you for ages they are not going to think of you when a job comes up.

Sitting at home in your pyjamas, waiting for an opportunity to knock, is not going to help.

Random visits to friends, footy games, family picnics are a good step. Always let people know that you are looking for work and what sort of work you are looking for.

You can also become more targeted with your desire to be seen and noticed.

Check The Ultimate Career Beginners Guide to make sure you are following a plan.

I went to school with Greg Yurisich who became a world famous opera singer.  Placido Domingo said Greg was his favourite baritone.

Greg left school and went to work in a clerical job for the ABC in Perth. It didn’t take long for him to get to know people in the orchestra, and to meetin singers visiting from all parts of the world.

Greg was seen in the ABC in Perth long before he performed in all the major opera houses and concert halls of the world. Having a magnificent voice was a good start, but there is nothing more common than wasted talent. Part of Greg’s success strategy was making sure people knew he existed.

4. Do stuff

Join a club, do volunteer work, play sport. You can’t change the world sitting at home in your pyjamas.

The more people you know, the more likely you are to find job leads. Your perfect employer isn’t going to come knocking at your door.

Get to know people

Find Guy Kawasaki’s tips on how to get people to like you HERE.

5. Unearth Your Own Network

Even a hermit on a deserted island probably has a friend who misses him.

Hermit on Island

It can be hard to see what is right in front of you.

Try creating a mind map of all the people who could possibly help you.

For each person put one thing that they could do to help you.

You can find a sample mind map HERE. Create_Your_Network

Get help

Ask a friend or family member to figure how each part of your network could possibly help you to find work.

Add social media connections to your mind map

Get a LinkedIn account, clean up your social media, join groups that represent your interests and start connecting.

Prioritise

Put your ideas into a list, figure out where to start and work through your list.

Good luck building your network

Get your personal online career coaching 

bust-small-72dpi

Bev Johnson

If you are stuck, getting started is the hardest thing. I can help you to get unstuck.

I have helped hundreds of people to start on their path to freedom.

You are free when you are being your authentic self, living the life you want to live. I can help you to do that.

 

 

 

 


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Feeling Restless and Anxious? You might have a bad case of “Zugunruhe”

Feeling restless and anxious?anxiety

Zugunruhe is being used to describe the anxiety young adults feel when they are getting ready to fly off to their futures.

Our young adults departure is being delayed by Covid, by recession, by climate change.

Zugunruhe is building.

It originally described migratory birds that get more and more anxious as the time to move on gets stronger.

If you check Johann Hari’s seven non biological causes for depression. (Lost Connections – Uncovering the real cause of depression and the unexpected solutions) it is easy to see a connection between the first six and the disconnection experiences of our senior students:

  1. Disconnection from others
  2. Disconnection from meaningful work
  3. Disconnection from meaningful values
  4. Disconnection from status
  5. Disconnection from a hopeful future
  6. Disconnection from nature
  7. Disconnection from childhood trauma

There has never been a time when year 12s have been in the front line facing down all of these disconnections. No wonder Zugunruhe is the new normal.

Drowning NOT Waving Resources

If you are feeling a bit of Zugunruhe these resources may help to connect you with a meaningful future.

If you would like someone to talk to go to:

There is a network of careers advisors and people who will support you to find a meaningful path forward. Email me to find a free service close to you.

Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter

There is a network of hundreds of career experts across WA who share information and advice so that you can keep up to speed with what is happening.

Please subscribe me to the insanely great and VERY reasonably priced In Focus Careers Newsletter. 

 

 

 


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What is the Difference? TAFE v Uni

Apprenticeships are the main things we know that TAFE delivers.

If you want to be a mechanic or electrician, you get an apprenticeship and go to TAFE.

But what about computer technicians, house designers, tourism operators,  agriculture and aged care workers?

Collage

There are hundreds of jobs you can get with a TAFE qualification.

Do I need a qualification AT ALL after leaving school??

Yes….. The bottom line is that you NEED a post school qualification if you are not to take a pathway to poverty.

Statistics 1

Employers pay for knowledge and skills, but:

  • people who have a Certificate III or IV have about the same unemployment rate as people who have a degree.
  • people who have a TAFE qualification earn about the same as people who get degrees. 

Statistics 4

(Statistics from Ivan Neville, Labour Market Research and Analysis, Dept of Labour)

Spot the Difference

Guess which Fashion Course is run at Curtin and which one is run at  TAFE?

You’ll focus on the relationship between garment and body, using a theoretical and contextual framework for understanding the cultural significance and practice of fashion design and global trends.

You’ll learn the principles of design and creative studio practice; and develop skills in fabric manipulation and construction, design, pattern-making, styling and fashion illustration.

Study the enterprise skills to work in fashion business.  Computer Aided Design (CAD) patternmaking, grading and illustration facilities, world class fashion design and textile forecasting resources, over 80 specialised industrial sewing machines, and a staff of fashion industry specialists, are key to our successes with our industry relevant courses, graduate employment outcomes and recognition in the sector.

It is easy to see that the one that mentions theory is a uni course while the one that focuses on CAD and pattern making has a more practical focus.

Length of Course

TAFE

An qualified electrician (Certificate III) takes about 4 years to get their license.

A barista takes about a week to get a piece of paper saying they have a set of skills (skills set) rather than a full qualification as a chef. A course on using farm chemicals safely may take a day and you don’t need to be a qualified farmer to do the course.

The focus of the courses is always on providing the skills that industry needs for a particular purpose.

Lots of TAFE courses give you credits at university. A Diploma of Work Health and Safety takes a year to complete and you will get between 6 months and a year’s credit for the Diploma if you do a degree.

Uni

A Bachelor of Science (Health, Safety and Environment) takes three years.

Cost per Course

TAFE

The maximum fee for the one year Diploma of Work Health and Safety is $2,848.50 which included tuition and resources that you may have to purchase.

TAFE Subsidies

If you do a course where there is a West Australian skills shortage, like cyber security, aged care or agriculture , your fees will be heavily subsidised by the State government.

Uni

The tuition fee for the three year Bachelor of Science degree is $8,460 (Roughly $1000/unit)

There are many scholarships available for university students.

TAFE is More Like School

When you go to TAFE you will probably go into a class of less than 25 students, a lot like a schoolroom or workshop designed to replicate what you will find in the workplace. Some TAFE courses are done entirely in the workplace. Some courses also have a significant theory component – Occupational health and safety, for example, has a lot of chemistry in the course. Veterinary nursing includes anatomy and physiology.

Uni has more Theory

Lectures are a routine teaching methodology at university. You may be in a group of 400 students in a lecture theatre as you are given information by an expert in their field. You are required to do reading on the subject BEFORE you go into the lecture. The subject of your lecture will be followed up by a tutorial or practical workshop on the subject where you can ask questions and gain more in depth knowledge.

Bev Johnson

Bev.Johnson

Email me for a FREE discussion about your options for next year. Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

If you would like to unearth your path to meaningful education or employment through online counselling to email me: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

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West Australian teachers save hours of work by subscribing and are confident that they have the information they need to provide professional career advice to their students.

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Year 12s are loving online career counselling

Maybe they are lonely. Maybe they are worried. Maybe they hope I will ground them as this Covid-19 storm swirls around us.

Whatever is going on, I am having great success with online counselling. Year 12s are loving talking over their possible futures online.

The Loveliness of Floating Ideas

When I go into a school to do career counselling I get too many kids in a day. They are scheduled too close together. I don’t have time to mull things over.  It is rushed and exhausting.

balloon

Now that we are doing it from home we have plenty of time to chat and float ideas.

There is no formula to this. We are both headed in the same direction but the path isn’t automated.

We chat. I muddle through my notes. I phone-a-friend. I research information. I hook students up with experts across the In Focus Network.

There is TIME to find the right path forward.

Chilling Out

Students have time to chat to their friends. They talk to their parents. They go for a walk and think. They go back to their teachers to talk.

Then come back and we chat again as we work our way through the career maze together.

Because there is time, the students can explore and unearth their best possible future.

Tap into my new SuperpowerSuperhero-Kid-NoBackground

If your student is feeling stressed about their future, I would love the opportunity to work with them using my new found power!!

Email me at: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au or phone 0434056412 for a chat.

 

 

 

 


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Your first full time job – Getting and apprenticeship. Case Study

Oscar Winter chose to go to Morley SHS where they run a specialist multimedia and broadcasting program. He loved it. By the end of the course in year 10 he had started up his own website building business.

His mates at Morley were doing the special aviation program. It sounded brilliant so in year 11 & 12 Oscar joined his friends in the course.

Oscar was good at maths and loves thinking through things logically. The course included mapping, planning, problem solving, meteorology and physics. It was perfect for him.

His interest in aviation became a passion. He really wanted to work in aircraft maintenance.Oscar Winter

Next Steps

In year 12 Oscar:

  • got help to put together his resume and a cover letter. It identifies a host of short courses, leadership roles, extra-curricular activities, and his work history. This really is a resume to be proud of.
  • sent his resume and covering letter out across the network he had built up while at school.
  • searched online for companies in WA that would possibly employ him as an apprentice and sent his resume to them.
  • got his family to contact people in their network to see if there were any leads for potential jobs.

Oscar got an offer of work experience at one of the companies he had contacted, and he is following up with the other companies he had written to.

He is now:

Find your path to your best future. Contact me for insanely great career advice. Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Become a member of the In Focus Careers Network

Join the powerful network of West Australian careers experts who support each other through In Focus Carers:

 

 

 


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A life well lived after school

 

The National Youth Commission  is aiming to make leaving school LESS like jumping off a cliff  

Jump off a cliffSEE: Survival Tips for School Leavers

It held its West Australian hearings last week and a number of In Focus Careers subscribers gave presentations.

I sang my song about schools needing to adopt a collaboration framework that smooths transition out of school.  

I was on after Ross Wortham from the Youth Affairs Council who was passionate, articulare and smart as.

Ross Wortham

He spends his days advocating for the removal of barriers that stop youth having a life well lived.

If you are leaving school, it may be worth checking out the YACWA services HERE.

If you provide services to kids transitioning from school and you are NOT collaborating with YACWA it may be worth checking out how you can work together. 1+1=3

Back to the National Youth Commission. You can subscribe to its newsletter HERE.

To get a complimentary copy of my Insanely Great Newsletter for West Australians:

 

Pre-apprenticeships


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Entry to pre-apprenticeship at 15

If you look up pre apprenticeships you will find a truckload being advertised for Semester 2.

All of the TAFE colleges and lots of other colleges seem to be advertising them so the level of competition for each place may be down.

Most of the pre-apprenticeship programs offered are Certificate II’s.

Students can meet entry with OLNA, NAPLAN, or by completing a Certificate I or II program at school.  They can also complete a Certificate I or II in General Education or a similar bridging program at a number of TAFE campuses.

TAFE colleges generally require that students are at least 15 years old. It is an adult learning environment and they will be mixing with adults.

(Thanks for South Metro TAFE for providing this information.)

The enrolment process usually involves:

  • Finding some courses online.
  • Apply by providing a resume with school results and references.
  • Go to an interview where you do your best to impress. See the Skillsroad video and the Youth Central site for tips.

If you get a place you need to work like crazy to impress through any contact with either lecturers or potential employers. There aren’t many apprenticeships going so you need to make a good impression while you have the chance. pre apprenticeship

In Focus Careers Newsletter

You can find a monthly feast of insanely great careers ideas and support through my In Focus Careers newsletter.

Send for a complimentary copy:

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

I want In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students. I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers and industry experts across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers.

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

See testimonials from West Australian schools HERE