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Leaving School Early IS AN OPTION

If you hate school, leaving IS AN OPTION. There is no point hanging around at school if you hate it.

Leave School Early

If you are worried that you won’t ever get into uni, you need to know that only 26% of uni students go straight there via the ATAR pathway.  Most university students get there through some other pathway.

If you are worried that you won’t ever get a well paid job, you need to find out about modern trends in lifelong learning and careers.

Good things about leaving school

Happiness is leaving school

 

  • You will feel better.

  • You will make new friends.

  • You will discover new things to enjoy.

Don’t jump too quickly

Don’t wait until you are ready to leave to start preparing. (If you are in Year 9 see the tips below.)

As soon as you start thinking of leaving school, talk to a career advisor. They  can help you to:

  • Do career quizzes and narrow down the jobs you would like.
  • Explore different jobs through VET courses and work experience.
  • Develop your work readiness and job application skills through part-time work and volunteering
  • Link you with appropriate support services that can support you as you leave school.

If you don’t have a school career advisor, go to a Jobs and Skills Centre for free career advice.

If you live in the Wanneroo or Armadale areas, engage with the Industry Training Hub. 

Each Training Hub is managed by a full-time Career Facilitator, providing an on-the-ground presence while delivering Training Hub services.

Career Facilitators work with and encourage young people to build skills and choose occupations in demand in their region, creating better linkages between schools and local industry, repositioning vocational education and training as a first-choice option. 

They mainly focus on year 11 and 12s but if you are in Year 10 you may be able to engage with their services. 

How to leave school

  • Arrange a full-time job, enrol in a full-time course or organise a combination of both. 
  • Get your parents to fill out and sign a Notice of Arrangement which details what you will do if you get permission to leave school.

The Notice of Arrangement is forwarded by your school to the Minister for Education for consideration. 

You will be informed of the Minister’s decision. It won’t be a straight “no”. You will either have your application approved, or you will be told what extra things you need to do in order to get approval. 

How old do I have to be to leave school?

In Western Australia you must stay at school until you finish Year 10, then you can get special permission to leave school before you finish Year 12 if you have:

                  1. a full time job or
                  2. full time study

Or a combination of both.

  1. Job

In most cases you need to be 15 to be employed or 13 to work in a fast food outlet. (There are exceptions to this. You can see details of the exceptions HERE.)

Tell people you want a job.

You can get a job through family and friends, through volunteering and impressing employers, through work experience and through part time work. 

2. Study

    • No OLNA or English Qualification?:

There are foundation and introductory courses at TAFE that do not have any English or maths requirements. You can be accepted into some of these courses while you are still of school age.

Go to a Jobs and Skills Centre for information about the courses that are available and which course would be best for you.

    • Year 11 or 12:

If you are okay academically but don’t want to go to school, go to a Jobs and Skills Centre and do an aptitude test, talk to a counsellor and get advice about your study options. 

3. Work and Study

If you get an apprenticeship or traineeship you will be doing on the job and off the job training.

You may be able to start studying a part time VET course now, and combine your study with a part time job. 

Common pathways from school

You can end up ahead of your friends who complete their WACE if you start a VET course early. You can do a Certificate II in Health Support Services and follow through with higher studies in the health sector.

Nursing

Common pathway from school

You can’t go wrong with qualifications in computing, particularly if you have a detailed, problem solving brain.

Computing

Middle School

If you are in Middle School and you are hating school:

  • Talk with your friends about what to do
  • Check with a career counsellor 
  • If you care for a family member, get support from Young-Carers
  • Go to your closest Jobs and Skills Centre to find out about alternatives to school in your area. They have information about courses and about jobs.

Year 9

The new Career Taster Program in WA schools gives Year 9s the chance to learn about opportunities after school. Through the Taster Program you will meet workers who will tell you about what their work involves. 

Through your contacts you may get additional volunteer experience, or a part time job. 

Summing Up

If you want to leave school early, don’t just jump. There are people and services around to help you to smooth your path into a life that you find much more fun than school.

  • Start to check out possible jobs. 
  • Investigate some of the services about in the mind map.
  • Start to talk to people who will help you to start your new life.

Good luck with your new adventures. 

Discover More

There are outstanding teachers in all disciplines in Western Australia, but great teaching doesn’t lead students to make great career choices.  Career Educators are the light on the hill that students and families need. 

Subscribe to In Focus Careers 

Keep up to date with the latest career opportunities in Western Australia.

Bev Johnson Director, In Focus Careers
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Climate change sees growth in glass and glazier apprenticeship opportunities

Hi

My name is Justin Wakeling and I’m a Master Glazier in Western Australia. 

Justin Wakeling Master Glazier at GlassCo Metro

 

I’m Operations Manager  at Glass.Co Metro which is based in Canning Vale.

Glass Co Metro Canning Vale

How I got into being a glazier

I got my first job in the glazing industry in 2004 through a friend who was a factory foreman for a large glass and aluminium company. After working on the factory floor for a couple of months I was offered an apprenticeship. It has been a great industry to work in. 

The trend to light and airy houses in a time of climate change has seen the growth in double glazing to make sure homes are energy efficient. 

Trend to more glass with thermal properties

My industry has grown and changed as we deliver new solutions that help architects and builders to be more creative and deliver better thermal efficiency.

Photo from toughglass.com.au 

We learn how to use new tools and equipment to manufacture these solutions.

Design solutions in toughened glass

We also upgrade homes with new windows, shower screens and wardrobes. 

Your world opens up

Once you finish your apprenticeship your world really opens up. You can set up your own business as a manufacturer or installer. You can train the next generation of apprentices or get into sales, or estimates or project management. You could even get into research and development of future products.  

After three years of working as a qualified glazier you can apply to become a Certified Glazier and you can become a Master Glazier when you’re qualified and work in the industry for ten years. 

My Workplace

As a Master Glazier and Operations Manager at Glass Co Metro I work to assure that we do a great job, according to Australian Standards. I also need to look after the wellbeing and safety of my team while supporting the growth and great reputation of our company. 

Apprenticeships at Glass Co Metro

There are currently 6 apprentices at Glass Co Metro, and our apprentices have won multiple awards at State and National level.

We like to take on 2 new apprentices at each year level. Two apprentices are about to finish their training and qualify, so we will be looking to put on two new apprenticeships in the near future. 

Glass Co Metro Apprentice

Careers in Glass and Glazing 

Get in touch with me if you are interested in getting an apprenticeship at Glass Co Metro. I would be happy to chat. Contact me at: Justin Wakeling (08) 9473 9499

justin@glasscometro.com.au 

Find out about glazing apprenticeships and training:

Mike Hidderley, Glazing Lecturer North Metropolitan TAFE – Balga Campus michael.hidderley@nmtafe.wa.edu.au

Find out about industry engagement:

Janine Blake, Industry Consultant, Food Fibre and Timber Industries Training Council 0427 351 027 janine@fftitc.com.au

To connect with trends, people and ideas for the future, subscribe to In Focus Careers News

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Furniture Trade Taster for West Australian Year 9 Students

The first Furnishings Trade Taster program is complete!

13 Balcatta Senior High School year 9 students attended four days of a new Furnishings Trade Taster.

This program aims to increase awareness of careers in the furnishing sector and to promote apprenticeships and training.

It was coordinated by the Food Fibre and Timber Industries Training Council in partnership with:

 

The project included two days at TAFE learning the cabinet making, and furniture finishing trades. Students also spent one day earning their White Card.

On the fourth day, the students met with employers including:

Lounge Innovation

Lounge Innovation – West Australian furniture makers

 

Jamel Industries

 

Artifex Australia

Styleside Cabinets

Construction Training Fund

No photo description available.
Construction Futures Centre – Belmont

Students were also taken through self awareness activities and spoke about how their school performance relates to career opportunities. All 13 students completed the project.

No alternative text description for this image
Balcatta High School Students

If you would like to find out more about Furnishings Trade Taster programs contact Janine@fftitc.com.au at the Food Fibre and Timber Industries Training Council.

For clear, trusted career advice for West Australians, subscribe to Infocus Careers News for West Australian students

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Evangelist for insanely great careers education in Western Australia

 

 

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Bullies 0 v Wheatbelt 10: What workers value in the new world

Bullying at Work

If you are being bullied, overlooked or discounted at work in Western Australia, you are probably looking for a new job where you will be valued.

Employers who treat their workers poorly, are losing them to better employers. In the USA it has been called The Great Resignation, and it’s happening in Western Australia.

The Value of Being Valued

Western Australian grains industry | Agriculture and Food
West Australian Wheatbelt

As worker shortages in WA are at critical levels, wheatbelt employers hope they have an edge by showing how much they value their workers.

Wheatbelt employers are part of the community. If they treated workers badly, the word would spread like wildfire.

Hutton and Northey Story

Hutton and Northey is an Agricultural Machinery Dealership with outlets across the wheatbelt which employ 65 staff.

Their critical edge in attracting workers is that they value their employees.

  • It employs apprentices and trainees and provides continuous training to employees so that they maintain their expertise.
  • They have been operating for 45 years and have one employee who has been employed for 33 years and another for 28 years, many have been there for 15 years.  
Hutton and Northey Agriculture Machinery

Workers stay because:

  • they are being treated as humans, not just workers
  • they are keen to engage with industry innovation and technological development
  • they can participate in agricultural research projects
  • they deliver expert advice and
  • they take part in and coach sports teams and engage with the whole community.

It isn’t just about money

Hutton and Northey is one of the many businesses trying to attract new workers against a background of the mining industry attracting workers by offering big dollars.

By valuing workers Hutton and Northey is attracting and retaining workers who don’t want to leave home for a tough FIFO life in mining camps.

Check out jobs in the wheatbelt

Being treated badly in the workplace, and not having anyone listen to you, is driving workers to jobs where they are a valued part of the community.

If you are looking for a lifestyle and workplace where you are treated like a human, not just a worker, contact Hutton and Northey for information about their career opportunities.

Subscribe to Infocus Careers News for West Australian Students

Evangelist for insanely great careers education in Western Australia

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2021 Training Award Finalists Announced

The WA Government has announced the 2021 Training Award Finalists.

These are the individual finalists as announced by Minister Sue Ellery and their chosen pathways.

Apprentice of the Year Finalists

Hayden Carvell, Mundaring: Light Vehicle Automotive

red and white vintage car parked in front of blue and white food stall
Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

Some of Hayden’s fondest childhood memories involve holding a torch as his dad, grandad and pop tinkered under the bonnet of a car. The family connection and the ability to bring something broken back to life is what led the apprentice mechanic to study a Certificate III in Light Vehicle Automotive with North Metropolitan TAFE.

With on-the-job learning at mycar, Hayden has helped induct and teach new team members about safety, work practices and methods of fixing cars, and recognises that technology is moving quickly.

Joann Knight, Brabham: Heavy Mobile Equipment

Visiting Kalgoorlie’s ‘super pit’ as a child and seeing all of the machines in action was enough to convince Joann of a career in mechanics. She followed her childhood dream, completing an apprenticeship as a mobile plant mechanic and landed a job with BHP.

Joann was open to every opportunity as she completed the Automotive Technician (Heavy Mobile Equipment) course through the Westrac Institute, and wanted to show that women can work and achieve their dreams in a male-dominated industry.

Stacey-Lee Boothman, Cooloongup: Engineering – Mechanical Fitter

Mechanical Fitter

Stacey-Lee always loved pulling things apart to see how they worked, so much so that at the age of 12 she started building bicycles. After years working in painting, mining, hospitality management and government administration, Stacey Lee’s determination to pursue a career she is truly passionate about has come full circle, completing a Certificate III in Engineering – Mechanical Trade (Mechanical Fitter) through South Metropolitan TAFE, and she is just shy of achieving her Diploma in Engineering.

Stacey-Lee has had to battle health issues throughout her studies, making her achievement of winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s Apprentice of the Year 2020 even more special.

Christian Ferrone, Bayswater: Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

Certificate IV Aeroskills – Photo courtesy TAFE Gippsland

A curiosity for how things work and a love of aeroplanes led Christian to pursue a career as a Licensed Aircraft Maintenance Engineer. Now employed by ExecuJet MRO Services Australia – where he completed his apprenticeship – the course taught him how to safely maintain gas turbine and propeller driven fixed wing aircraft.

Christian completed the Diploma in Aeroskills (Mechanical) with a 95 per cent course average and was in the first cohort of WA apprentices through RTO Aviation Australia.

Now a mentor for other apprentices coming through, Christian knows teamwork is an essential part of the aviation industry.

WA Trainee of the Year Finalists

Bonnie Barber, Bridgetown: Administration

Bonnie knew she wanted to join the mining industry when she was in her final year of school, but she did not know which career pathway to follow with the many options available in the sector.

relaxed female secretary with feet on table in workplace
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

An administration traineeship through Combined Team Services and working with Talison Lithium gave her the perfect mix of support and resources, and she found the ability to study and work a full-time job attractive.

Bonnie says the Certificate IV in Business qualification and hands-on experience has set her up for a fulfilling career working in a field she is passionate about, and she has now accepted a new position as Human Resource Administration Assistant working in her dream professional field.

Amber Ugle-Hayward, Karrinyup: Government

Wanting to pursue a career that was meaningful, challenging and would make a positive impact on the lives of many Western Australians, Amber applied for the Public Sector Commission’s Aboriginal Traineeship Program, knowing it would give her a ‘foot in the door’ to government. Amber has made the most of her placement with the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage, gaining practical knowledge while completing a Certificate III in Government through Aspire Performance Training.

Throughout the traineeship, Amber has proactively sought opportunities to further her career and expand networks, establishing a reputation as a highly competent team member who consistently displays leadership, collaboration, respect and integrity.

Amber says the experience has allowed her to develop her confidence and communication skills to raise awareness of Aboriginal culture within the State Government, and directly influence the department’s internal policies.

Vikki Doecke, Kelmscott: Leadership and Management

Passionate about food and hospitality since becoming a chef in her early 20s, Vikki wanted to stay in the industry but broaden her career. Initially afraid to make the change into management, Vikki says she finally started living life on her terms.

A Certificate IV in Leadership and Management through Stanborough Wemyss Contracting was the perfect training alongside her Assistant Village Manager role with Sodexo, which provides catering and managing services at mine sites.

The course developed Vikki’s leadership skills so much so that she is now Village Manager of the Wintamarra site and thoroughly enjoys applying all of her past experience with her newly acquired skills.

WA Vocational Student of the Year finalists

Maxine Turner, Fremantle: Community Services

SCHOLARSHIP IN COMMUNITY SERVICES | Admission | Skilled Visa | Sponsored  Jobs | RPL

Volunteering throughout India and Vietnam helping disadvantaged children and families guided Maxine towards her chosen career. Completing a Diploma of Community Services through North Metropolitan TAFE led Maxine to gaining full-time work at the Department of Communities, Child Protection and Family Support, following a successful work experience stint.

Maxine now gets to carry out her passion for helping those in need on a daily basis, using the skills and knowledge obtained through her course in her role as a residential worker.

Nerine Boulter, White Gum Valley: Aquaculture

The first investment fund for sustainable fish farming | Virgin

Returning to study as a mature age student gave Nerine a passion for learning that she had not experienced before. Her enthusiasm for sustainable aquaculture has been ignited during completion of the Diploma of Aquaculture at South Metropolitan TAFE, where has excelled, nominated for the South Metropolitan TAFE’s Vocational Student of the Year in 2019 and 2020.

Nerine hopes to build her own sustainable, environmentally friendly business, growing and harvesting native seaweed for use in health foods, animal feed, cosmetics, bio-plastics and bio-fuel.

Meg Maroni, Albany: Information Technology

PC Technician | Definition, Job description, salary & Jobs!

Achieving a better future for her local community by implementing and demonstrating digital technologies led Meg to complete her Certificate IV in Information Technology at South Regional TAFE.

Now employed in the industry as the Technical Support Officer for Little Grove Primary School, Meg applies the skills gained in her studies every day to the upkeep of the school’s physical and networking digital infrastructure, and maintenance of implemented systems and software. Meg also assists teaching staff to design class exercises and assignments to fulfil their digital curriculum, and is now tutoring a student carrying out the same course she successfully completed.

Zoe Tucker, Bayswater: Landscape Design

Twenty years after leaving school, Zoe finally feels like she has found her pathway. Finding traditional work roles not conducive to family life, the single mother of three took the plunge towards a new career and followed her passion, studying a Certificate IV in Landscape Design – a perfect fit for a creative person with a love of plants and nature and background in architecture.

Zoe has not looked back, winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s Vocational Student of the Year 2020 and relishing the opportunity to create greener spaces.

WA Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander of the Year 2021 finalists

Kevin Wilson, Victoria Park: Graphic Design

Growing up as a Wongai man from the Goldfields region, Kevin has had an interest in art for as long as he can remember. After a few years and a few too many run-ins with police, he decided he could not keep going down that path, so he signed up for an apprenticeship in print finishing at North Metropolitan TAFE, which was just the beginning of his TAFE journey. After completing his Diploma in Graphic Design, he continued on to the Advanced Diploma, becoming more confident in himself, his work and how he speaks about it. Kevin says he feels like he has found his calling in life, and since finishing has gone on to co-found Nani Creative, a graphic design company specialising in design for projects promoting Aboriginal tourism.

Grant Syron, Como: Maritime Operations

Sailing the seas may not be for everyone, but for Grant, pursuing a maritime career was an opportunity to see the world, meet new people and have a new challenge every day. From growing up in a Sydney housing commission, Grant says he had wonderful role models in his hard-working parents, who showed him anything is achievable if you put your mind to it.

After completing the Diploma of Maritime Operations (Watchkeeper Deck) through South Metropolitan TAFE, Grant has gone on to become a second officer, with his qualification allowing him to travel the world working on any ship.

Grant’s hard work and commitment is an inspiration to the whole community, and he has ambitions to take his studies and career development even further, with his long-term goal of becoming a Master Mariner.

Keira Gentle, Ridgewood: Fashion Design and Merchandising

From a young age Keira wanted to design clothes, and after a massive life turn around she decided to take a leap and enrol in a Diploma of Applied Fashion Design and Merchandising at North Metropolitan TAFE. Juggling full-time study with being mum to her daughter, Keira said she has not looked back and is living her dream daily, with the opportunity to explore her creative side and the routine of study giving her the strength to manage her time and provide balance in her life.

Most importantly, studying the course has sparked her creative side that was always there but needed to be developed and nurtured.

Keira says that connection to creativity has been life changing, and she can now see a future where she can work in an industry that she loves, and has all the skills needed to develop a satisfying and challenging career.

Sterling Winmar, Orelia: Engineering – Industrial Electrician

Losing his father at the age of 13, Sterling did not know what he wanted to do with his life, but had the mental push to make his dad proud. Making the most of every opportunity that came his way, he jumped at the chance to take up an apprenticeship through South Metropolitan TAFE and the National Energy Technician Training Scheme (NETTS), completing a Certificate III in Engineering – Industrial Electrician.

His journey in the oil and gas sector has given him valuable life skills as well as experience in a thriving sector. Sterling has been a strong ambassador and role model, assisting younger apprentices and promoting the NETTS program by public speaking at schools.

WA School-based Apprentice of the Year finalists

Courtney Short, Ellenbrook: Commercial Cookery

Chef apprentice

Preparing meals with and for her family has always brought great joy to Courtney, so it seemed a natural fit to pursue her love of cooking at the age of 15, commencing a Certificate III in Commercial Cookery.

Successfully juggling her school work at Mercy College with an apprenticeship through North Metropolitan TAFE, Courtney says the knowledge and skills she has already developed by working alongside chefs at Pan Pacific Hotel (through Hospitality Group Training) are essential for working in the industry.

Now aged 17, Courtney is well on her way to achieving her dream of becoming a chef and she is so pleased she followed a VET pathway.

Taj Morris, Glenfield: Commercial Cookery

Working as a waiter in his nan and pop’s family restaurant gave Taj his first taste of the hospitality industry. With his mother and two uncles all chefs, cooking is in his blood, so it was an easy choice for Taj to do a school-based apprenticeship, taking on a Certificate III in Commercial Cookery at Geraldton’s Central Regional TAFE.

Taj says with a chef qualification he knows he will have many future employment opportunities and feels that the chance to learn practical industry skills while still studying at Nagle Catholic College has prepared him well.

Samantha Winter, Lower Chittering: Government

In Year 10 and unsure of what career pathway to pursue, Samantha heard about the Certificate II in Government through the Public Sector Commission’s school-based traineeship. Seeing it as a great opportunity, Samantha started the traineeship through Aspire Performance Training.

Juggling Year 12 at Bullsbrook College three days a week, a large portion of Samantha’s training is done on the job at Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety.

Samantha sees it as a major head start in the workforce, broadening her knowledge, making connections and gaining independence and confidence.

WA Cultural Diversity Training Award 2021 finalists

Marli Nicholls, Carlisle: English as an Additional Language

Adult Migrant English Program

With knowledge and experience already gained from her home country Brazil, Marli knew that the language barrier was the only thing in her way when relocating to Perth with her Australian husband and their children. 

Marli decided to take English classes to start her new life here, enrolling in Certificate IV EAL (English as an Additional Language) at South Metropolitan TAFE, to help her work, connect with people, make new friends and participate in the local community and her children’s school.

Marli says her course has offered her so much more than language skills, gaining self-confidence, time management, teamwork, problem-solving and leadership skills.

Agnes Toluwade, Leeming: Mental Health

260 million people and less than 1000 psychiatrists, Indonesia's mental  health worker shortage

Migrating from Nigeria in 2015, the first time Agnes heard about the suicide of a teenager on the news, she was jolted. Determined to take action and contribute to her new home country, Agnes decided to study a Certificate IV in Mental Health and be part of the solution for a mentally healthy Australia.

The course at North Metropolitan TAFE has helped her understand the many issues that impact on mental health and the ways to support people’s recovery.

Agnes has crossed several barriers to pursue her study and hopes that others in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities will see that studying at TAFE offers many opportunities.

WA International Student of the Year finalists

Johanna Faber, Yokine: Travel and Tourism

Johanna has always been passionate about travelling, so when she came to Australia from Germany in 2017 and fell in love with the country, she decided she wanted a career in travel and tourism.

By studying in a different country, Johanna felt it would offer her the opportunity of experiencing travel and tourism first-hand, taking part in a different culture and learning a new language while completing her course – a Diploma of Travel and Tourism Management at North Metropolitan TAFE.

Studying allowed Johanna to gain confidence in communicating in English while learning the many facets of the industry, and she was able to land a job as a travel consultant. While COVID-19 forced the closure of the office, it has not deterred Johanna from working in the industry.

Shalynn Buss, Lathlain: Event Management

Back in Canada in 2014, Shalynn was studying Business Administration to become a lawyer. During her studies she took an introduction to events elective course, which sparked her love of creating something out of nothing that brought people together. Fast forward to July 2020, she finally took the plunge into formalising her passion, starting a Diploma of Event Management through South Metropolitan TAFE.

Experience has shown Shalynn she learns best in vocational settings, continually challenging herself and demonstrating her skills and abilities in real-world scenarios, which lead to winning South Metropolitan TAFE’s International Student of the Year 2020.

Shalynn has been putting her industry knowledge into practice, working for a small wedding and event business, and she hopes to one day own her own wedding planning business.

Aurelie Jammes, Scarborough: Event Management

Adelaide Convention Centre | ULA Group

With a Masters degree in Events, Tourism and Hospitality and experience working around the world, French native Aurelie was employed at a winery in the Swan Valley when she realised she enjoyed in-house events. When COVID-19 hit she did not let losing her job get in the way, taking the opportunity to enhance her knowledge about this part of the industry by starting a Diploma of Event Management at South Metropolitan TAFE.

Aurelie says it was the best decision she ever made, now working as a hotel event operations supervisor. Aurelie is also an ambassador for Go Study, sharing her challenges and achievements as in international student in Australia.

Congratulations on getting to the finals. Good Luck

Bev Johnson

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au