In Focus Careers

Be a Hero in the Classroom


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Which Uni is Best for YOU?

TISC applications for university in 2020 open on August 5. Students who want to go to university will be asked to identify their preferred courses and preferred university.

There are five main universities that Year 12s traditionally choose between in Western Australia (and a number of courses that you can do online).

If you know some of the key features of these universities it may be easier to make your choice.

Notre Dame 

91.1% of Notre Dame undergraduate students were satisfied with the overall quality of their learning experience according to the Quality Indicators of Learning and Teaching (QILT).

EVERY UNIVERSITY WISHES THEY GOT THAT!!

Notre Dame

Notre Dame is a Catholic University but you don’t need to be Catholic or Christian or even religious to go there, and the fees are comparable with other universities.

The point of difference is that Notre Dame does have a spiritual, values driven, caring approach to teaching and learning which underpins their interactions and decision making.  That’s why they are topping the QILT ratings.

It is quite a small university with 10,000 students and the vast majority of them are domestic students.

The university is in beautiful renovated old buildings around Fremantle.

Pastoral care and support developed for international students has been made available to help regional and remote students to settle in. The only shortcoming is the lack of Notre Dame student accommodation but the student support services people will help students to find accommodation to meet their needs.

 

Curtin University

Curtin is by far our biggest university with over 50,000 students. It seems like a city with business centres, shops, gyms, accommodation and bands and food trucks, art galleries and theatres.

Curtin

I think undergraduate students could have a ball at Curtin, but the sheer size of of the place can be daunting. You need to actively work at getting engaged with the Curtin community, both social and academic, to make the most of your Curtin experience.

Curtin knows this and has invested in providing plenty of help for new students and for students with special needs,  but it is up to you to seek it out.

Because of the size of the university there are many opportunities available for students to extend their experience, in Australia and internationally.

Curtin is part of a knowledge precinct in Bently with CSIRO, Tech Park and the Pawsey supercomputer in the area. Staff and students actively seek to engage with industry to get knowledge and experience and do industry based research. It is number 2 in the world for Metals and Mining Engineering programs. This industry focus underpins the feel at Curtin.

Curtin seems exciting, dynamic and very cosmopolitan with lots of international students and with campuses in Malaysia, Singapore and Dubai as well as the one at Bentley and in Kalgoorlie.

ECU – Edith Cowan University

The Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching ranks ECU as the top public university in Australia for undergraduates’ student experience. You can feel the quality of the experience when you contact ECU for information. They get back to you. They try to help.

ECU

ECU started as a college for teacher training and gradually expanded its courses with WAAPA being one of the first ventures into new areas. Now WAAPA has a reputation as one of the BEST performing arts learning academies in the world.

ECU’s more recent expansion has been into engineering with significant investment into new facilities, international learning opportunities and strong demand for graduates.

ECU is pretty big but students are on the Mt Lawley and Joondalup campuses so it doesn’t feel overwhelming.

The buildings are great examples of design with some of the coolest architecture in Western Australia.

ECU is manageable and there is a strong student centric management focus which means students get help to succeed. There are many alternate pathways into ECU including the UniPrep program and experienced based entry.

People who didn’t think they could get into uni and succeed can are supported to thrive at ECU.

Murdoch University

Murdoch has recognised that the world is changing and that there is a disconnect between education and where jobs are emerging. It has introduced “adaptive expertise” as a learning spine being introduced across the university.

Murdoch

 

They are focusing on adapting traditional courses with the application of technologies. So History + STEM could result in machine learning that unearths previously unknown information about cultures. Journalism + STEM, as seen in the use of drones, is revealing what is happening in emergency or war environments.

Murdoch has a strong focus on getting girls into engineering. They have engaged with schools and support in industry to lift the number of girls entering this field which delivers 25% of the world’s CEOs.

Murdoch has the biggest percentage of international students in WA.

They are teaching students to think globally, to seek ways to apply technology to their work and to work collaboratively.

UWA – University of Western Australia

This is our oldest university. Many industry, political and community leaders in Western Australia went to UWA which gives strong links between UWA and leadership across the State.

UWA

The UWA campus is beautiful with Winthrop Hall being the most recognised symbol of “a university” in WA. The gardens, theatres and art gallery and its role as the initiator of the Festival of Perth make UWA a hub of culture.

UWA has positioned itself as the university for high academic performers and many high achieving school leavers identify UWA as their first preference.

It is aware of its low QILT satisfaction results and is supporting strategies like the Fogarty Foundation Edfutures initiative and consulting with experts in an effort to become more student centric in its approach.

CQU – Central Queensland University

This is a new comer to Western Australia and it is working hard to attract students from their traditional university pathways with courses in sonography and echocardiography which are new to WA.

CQU

The main campus is located near the bottom of William Street near Elizabeth Quay and they have set up study hubs in Busselton, Broome, Geraldton and Karratha. These are often on TAFE campuses.

Many of the students are mature aged, external students who make use of online learning, occasional face to face contact and phone calls to fit their learning around their work and other demands.

Although there are 20,000 students at CQU, they are spread across Australia and numbers in WA are still quite small.

Comparison

The comparison of student experience outcomes puts Notre Dame as a clear leader with
ECU also doing well.

QILT comparison

Each university has different features that will impact on your choices.

What possibilities are open to you?

Subscribe to the insanely great In Focus Careers Newsletter to find out.

 

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Bev Johnson

If you would like expert assistance in making your TISC choices contact me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Open Day Worksheets for Years 10, 11 and 12

Three worksheets to guide years 10, 11 or 12s through uni open days. 

Open days start in July. Students who want to go to uni really need to start going to open days in year 10.

These three worksheets build students’ capacity to find the right university path from school.

Year 10 Open Day Worksheet

There is so much to discover and experience at university open days that students need to start going to them in Year 10.  Those students who are most familiar with their university have the best chance of success.

The smart trend is to do your research on social media then go to the coolest exhibitions for the experience and for your selfie. 

Amazed

The Year 10 Open Day Worksheet is short and simple. It will help you to get the most out of your day and help you to find careers to investigate over the next year.

Year 11 Open Day Worksheet

If you went to some open days last year you will know what to expect and can plan your visit to get more out of it.

It is best to go with a family member as they care for you and may find out stuff that you miss.

The Year 11 Open Day Worksheet gives some shortcuts to planning your day so that you have the best time possible as you narrow down your choices for post school university courses.

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Year 12 Open Day Worksheet

The journey from school is a long one. Finding the right path to take is a good start. 

Discovering your right career won’t come to you in a blinding flash of light. It will come in a whisper. You need to take time to listen. 

The Year 12 Open Day Worksheet will guide those who are thinking of going to uni and who have an idea of what they want to do. 

If you still have no idea what to do when you leave school PLEASE seek advice from a school or Jobs and Skills Centre career advisor or BOTH!! They will help you to clarify what you want to do. Shoes

Related Posts

4 Tips for University Open Days

Which Uni is Best for You?

You are not the first person with a disability to go to uni

No ATAR? Go to uni this way

For your monthly does of inspiration and insanely great career information subscribe to my newsletter:

 

 

Testimonial

I have found your material invaluable.  The information you have put together is thorough – a one-stop-shop in a sea of information that is out there.  I have utilised this information on a regular basis with others throughout the school.

(South Metropolitan Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers.

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Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

M: 0434056412

 


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3 Steps to Survival in the Future Workforce

You may be feeling that your future is spinning out of control. Breathless reports of the latest discovery that is going to take your job add to the confusion.

The skills you need to survive in the future won’t be too different to ones you needed in the past. 

1. Be Aware

Keep up with changes so that they aren’t overwhelming:

World Economic Forum Newsletter

The World Economic Forum is the leader in thinking about how to cope with the future. They don’t have all the answers but they are the smartest. They meet in Davos each year to talk about issues and they are a conduit to reports and advice.

You can subscribe to their emails here.

Naked Scientist Podcast

I liked the information about emerging jobs in this Naked Scientist podcast on Life in the Year 2100. Go to the 24 minute mark to get to the best bits. Naked scientist

The Third Industrial Revolution Video

For something radical and inspiring go to Jeremy Rivkin’s iconic Third Industrial Revolution.  He paints a bleak picture for a lot of the video but comes up with optimistic positive strategies later.

The New Work Smarts

Any of the reports from the Foundation for Young Australians provide great guidance about where we are heading and what to do. Perhaps the New Work Smarts provides the clearest direction on how to create your work safety net.

2. Build a Strong Network

Your family and friends will be your support framework throughout your life. They will  celebrate your wins and help you when you are down.Bear joke.jpg

A strong network doesn’t just happen. You may be lucky and have a great family. Your school may be a honey pot of fantastic friends. Or you may have to design your own network. Choose carefully.

Don’t waste time on losers. Think about the sorts of friends you want. Don’t suck up to them. Check out who is around.

This Coggle map I named Stand on the Shoulders of Giants. It may give you some ideas on how to consciously and deliberately build a strong network.  Stand on the Shoulders of Giants

3. Be Good at Something

Alan Finkle is Australia’s Chief Scientist. He recommends that you develop “T shaped” skills.

First, be aware that employers look for “T-Shaped” individuals, where the vertical pole of the T represents deep discipline-specific knowledge and the horizontal bar of the T represents 21st Century skills. Restrict your focus to one or the other and you will be limiting your employment options.

Don’t expect to leave school, uni or TAFE and be the expert. Speak to any employers and they will give you examples where the person with the better interpersonal skills got the job over the academic expert. It has never been more important to keep on learning in order to remain the expert.

Skills WEF

So, what next?

I keep researching and networking to keep up to speed with what is happening. It can be overwhelming but careers teachers are keeping their eye on the ball and they are the best ones to go to for information and advice.

Most West Australian high schools subscribe to my newsletter. You can get a complimentary copy to check out.

In Focus Careers Newsletter

Get career information from a network of insanely great West Australian career professionals:

Testimonial:

I loved this month’s newsletter! There were so many useful links that I’m going to use like the Logistics Training Council publications and the Future skills Framework infographic on our demographic (Durack). So much handy information – I even signed up for the Public Sector commissions job search so that I can pass onto students (past/present) when opportunities come up for traineeships. (Northern regional Catholic Education School)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 


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Every student deserves a great careers teacher

The future success of students as they leap into the turbulent world beyond school can depend entirely on the care, wisdom and knowledge of their careers teacher.

When you leave school there is no bridge to your next chapter. There is no magical path into your ideal future.Math teacher smiling

When you leave school your English (maths, history) teacher has finished their job.  They helped you to get the best education in their field. That’s it. Their work is done.

There is no one on the other side of the school gate to make sure you succeed.

Career Advisors Have Done it All Before

teacher female close upIf you had a good careers teacher you will know what waits for you on the other side of the school gate and you will have a plan.

It is the career advisors job to know what is possible. They have guided hundreds of students to discover what is possible and plan how to get there. They love helping students to unearth their dreams.

Go to see your school career advisor. Tap into their wisdom and knowledge.

Their secret power is that they care about your future.

If you don’t have a career advisor to help you, go to a Jobs and Skills Centre and ask for help. It’s free.

Don’t leave school without a plan

coggle-map-3You may be okay while you are still in a supportive, familiar school environment, but leaving school is risky. Australia is experiencing an epidemic of mental health issues in our young adult population. 

Tap into all of the free support and advice that your school has to offer so that you have a plan with you when you leave school.

Tap into support from your career advisor, pastoral care officer, year coordinator… whoever you get along with. Ask them for help to develop a plan. Keep going until you are happy with your plan.

Getting on the Uni Bus

Many school leavers go to uni because they don’t know what else to do.

Uni career advisors come to school. They tell you how wonderful their uni is. They hold out their hand and say,  “Come with me”.

The TISC application arrives.

Fullscreen capture 28082017 70902 PM.bmp

So you all get on the uni bus.

You can check how much that ride will cost you HERE.

Do your research and work with an expert career advisor before you lock yourself in.

Some go to TAFE

needle-in-a-haystack-1752846_1920There are so many VET courses and variations on courses that finding the ideal one for you is like finding a needle in a haystack.

The new Jobs and Skills Centres aren’t just for VET courses. They deliver a guiding light to students who don’t know what to do when they leave school.

Having a Gap Year

The fear of the unknown often stops students choosing a gap year. Those who do make this choice often choose an organised program that supports them into their future.

Find information on taking a gap year HERE.

Ask your career advisor what gap year program will suit your personality and future plans.

Getting a Job

Statistics 1The only problem with getting a job without planning to do any further study is that you are locking yourself into the lowest paid sector or the workforce.

Get a job, sure but do a Certificate III part time after school to set yourself up for a bigger income and more career choices.

Ask your career advisor what part time courses you can take to improve your future career.

In Focus Careers Newsletter

Discover your world of possibilities with a monthly dose of insanely great career news and information:

 

Testimonial

I have found your material invaluable.  The information you have put together is thorough – a one-stop-shop in a sea of information that is out there.  I have utilised this information on a regular basis with others throughout the school.

(South Metropolitan Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian careers teachers and students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers
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Bev Johnson

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 


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Five Career Things for Year 12s to Do in April

You have fewer than 20 contact teaching weeks to go before the ATAR. The April holidays are going to be your last chance to sit back and get organised.

Tip 1 Relax

April is the last relax time you are going to have until your final exams are over.

cat stretching

  • Plan your time through until the ATAR exams, including relaxation time.
  • Take that time off…. Guilt free. Total relaxation.

Tip 2 Humanities or Science? Uni or TAFE?

  • Humanities or science? Which way do you want to go? If you can’t decide go to these sites for help. (If you contact me I will email you a link to this Coggle map so that you can get the links without looking them up.)

Hear your dream snipped

Tip 3 Check out the Year 12 Handbook

In Year 12 it is time to check important dates, exam information, double check WACE requirement to make sure you comply. They are all in the Year 12 Information Handbook.Year 12 handbook

Tip 4  Enrol in ATAR Revision Courses for Mid Year Holidays

Most successful students get at least some revision support from one of the companies that provides mid year ATAR revision programs. 

Tip 5 Set SMART Goals and Ask for Help

  • List your subjects
  • Set a SMART goal for each subject
  • Check with each teacher to see what you need to do to achieve your goal
  • Ask them for help to achieve that goal.

If you have any great tips for Year 12 survival please send them through.

The monthly In focus Careers Newsletter helps you to see what is possible. Contact me for a complimentary copy.

Testimonial:

Thank you for such wonderful work throughout the year. (XXXX) SHS has found your newsletters to be so very, very helpful. We are so appreciative of your efforts and look forward to the 2019 issues.

(Top Ranking Metropolitan Government School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers
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Bev Johnson

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 


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Anything BUT Teaching

This “Anything BUT….” story is inspired by my own family.

We have teachers all through our family. I was determined to be different but after getting a degree and mucking around for a while I went back to uni and did my Dip Ed and started teaching at Tuart Hill High School.

Anything BUT Teaching 1

The first year was a dreadful shock

It should be illegal to give a first year out teacher a class of 28 tough year 10 boys!!! Each one was a challenge and as a pack they were a nightmare.

I worked so hard. The only time I would have off was Friday night. I would go out with teachers after school and we would talk about work and the wise, experienced teachers would give me advice. I’d do preparation and marking all day Saturday and Sunday and on every other night of the week. I walked, talked, and dreamed about teaching…. and I cried a lot.

I taught for 5 years around Western Australia before going on maternity leave. I can remember the first morning I woke up NOT having dreamed and worried about lessons or some kid.

After having my daughters I moved from teaching to TAFE and to the public service generally and none of those jobs were as tough as teaching.

The memory softened. I eventually went back to teaching in the Northern Territory and there it was again. Hours of worrying, preparation and marking.

The stress was way more than any other job I have ever done.

My kids grew up with me saying “Anything BUT teaching” and all three of them are teachers!

And they LOVE, LOVE, LOVE it.

They love the kids, they love the subjects they teach, they love making a difference and feeling as if the work they do is worthwhile.

A friend I did the Dip Ed with recently said to me that she was so happy she chose teaching. She feels as if her whole career has been worthwhile.

So there you go. I think teaching is a tough gig but it is important work, you can make a difference and great teachers change lives.

If you would like a complimentary copy of my Insanely Great In Focus Careers Newsletter please let me know:

Testimonial

I have to say Bev your emails, newsletters, website and Facebook are wonderful! Such a valuable resource you offer. Being in this new role it is wonderful having everything so organised and easily accessed… thanks for a great publication/service!

(VERY remote West Australian school)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Consult across the In Focus Careers network gathering information and advice to share.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

Bev Johnson

M: 0434 056 412

Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 


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Getting together with employers – the Prenup

Your students need to get out more.

Your local council (bakery/architect/hospital) is willing to take on kids for work experience (mentoring/project collaboration).

You are about to form a partnership to give kids this great opportunity.

Harmony 1

STOP!! 

Before you walk into the sunset together…. What about a prenup?

It is best to talk about your prenup with your future partner while things are good.

Things WILL go wrong. The kids will play up or break things. The employer will be away. Duty of care won’t be taken care of.

A prenup on the back of an envelop is better than nothing.

Your prenup should consider:

  • Who is responsible for what and at what quality.
  • How the partnership is to be managed.
  • If there are any legal issues, like duty of care.
  • If there are any costs and who should pay for them.
  • What IT platforms are you going to use to share information.

If you would like to discuss how to write your prenup email me: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

To stay up to date with careers events and news subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter.

 

 

 


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Create an Insanely Great School Leavers’ Safety Net

Leaving home to study at university or TAFE is a giant leap. Especially for RRR students.

Notre Dame University has a RRR Student Support Program which is like their support for international students. No other Western Australian university or TAFE has anything special in place.

Students flounder. Parents panic.

Stressed parents can help their school leavers to make the giant leap seem more like a hop by doing these things.  Tell them to….

1.   Get a Mentor

People love it when you value their knowledge and expertise so getting a mentor isn’t rocket science. Just be nice and value what the mentor tells you. Find someone whose subject knowledge you value and start to ask them for advice and support.

TAFE

Vocational colleges like TAFE do not have formal mentor programs.

Students will need to put in some effort to find a good mentor. They may choose to build a mentor relationship with a lecturer, with one of the many technical experts that work in colleges or with an older student.

This will be their “go to” person when they are wondering what is coming next or how to do something.

Uni

Universities have formal mentor programs.

The mentors are older students who are building their resumes by demonstrating leadership through mentoring.

New students are often allocated a mentor during orientation. If you didn’t get one, or if you didn’t get along with your mentor, go to the guild, or student services office, and ask for a mentor in your faculty.

Getting a mentor means you are consciously and deliberately working towards a successful career. That can’t be a bad thing.

2.   Find and Use Support Services

Support services are numerous and varied, and they are usually free.  You really are not alone but unearthing the support service you need may take some digging.

  • Career Counsellors. Most tertiary education institutions have career counsellors. These can be your lifeline when you start to doubt your subject or course choices. Don’t just drop out. Go to one of the counsellors to see what you can do.

 

  • Specialist Support. There will be support for students with identifiable different needs, like Aboriginal students, people with a disability or people from non English-speaking backgrounds. If you are eligible for these services, take advantage of them.

 

  • Classes in Study Skills. There may be classes on study skills, or how to write an essay. They will be designed to address a problem like not knowing how to study most efficiently, or how to write an essay with correct referencing. These skills can save you hours throughout your student career.

 

  • Industry Group Services. Some industry groups, like the building and construction industry, provide mentors, scholarships, mental health programs and industrial relations support through the union. Google your industry to find what support services they offer.

 

  • Specialist Industry Support. Specialist support groups, like Women in Science and Technology and associations like the Marketing Association, the Accountants Association or the Australian Computer Society can help you while you are studying, give you a network for applying for jobs and they will be able to tell you about scholarships, internships and financial support.

3.   Stick with Family and Family Friends

Leap and the Net will appear PNGHaving the freedom to do what you like away from home is exciting. Taking risks is part of the excitement.

New students are a target for crooks and scammers. The crooks and scammers don’t come with it written on their foreheads. They are usually nice, friendly, helpful people who know how to win the trust of a new student.

Believing the old Zen saying, Leap and the net will appear and keep you safe whenever you take a risk, could result in you getting a criminal record or being physically assaulted.

Make a formal plan to stay connected with family and old family friends. If you are unsure about someone, invite them to come with you when you visit your family.

If you don’t feel comfortable inviting them to meet your family or family friends, check your own feelings. Your innate wisdom may be telling your something.

If you invite your new acquaintance and they choose not to come a few times, you will start to question their friendship.

If they do come, and your family does not feel comfortable about this new person, listen to your family. They are the ones who will provide a safety net that protects you as you leap into your new life.

4.   Say “YES, and …”

If you just learn from class when you go to uni or TAFE, you are missing out.

post-it-notes-There is so much more to enjoy. There are so many opportunities to engage with your industry, enter competitions, take on projects, join clubs, go for scholarships.

Don’t just wait for an opportunity to fall into your lap. Look for things that might interest you on campus noticeboards and join online groups to find out what is going on.

When you hear about an opportunity on campus say “Yes, and where do I apply, what else can I do, when can I start?”

Growth opportunities are generally set up by your campus to help you to have a better student experience.

Just by applying you are creating your own opportunities. You might find out where you are going by setting out in a different direction.

5.   Create a Small Group

If you have friends from school studying at your campus they are your obvious first point of contact. You will soon be overwhelmed with new people who are vying for your attention and you will be trying to connect with new people who you meet.

Trying to be friends with everyone will exhaust you. Focus on a small group and establish friendships with them.  You can make friends with other people later.

HINT: Be nice to everyone. There is a good chance you will be in the same workplace as them at some stage in your career. It is important that they remember how great you are.

Find out what careers information came out this month. Get a free copy of the latest In Focus Careers Newsletter.

 

 

 

 


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How to set up a successful school industry partnership

If you have ever tried to take a class on an excursion you know how hard it is. The maths staff complain that they need the students to do a test on that day. The front office staff complain that you haven’t finished the paper work. The students don’t bring in their money.

It doesn’t seem worth the effort.

School systems aren’t set up to support learning out of school grounds. 

As the boundaries between schools, universities and registered training organisations (RTOs) become more porous there is a need for schools to become more agile in their approach to learning.

Unis and RTOs have these 5 systems in place that support flexible learning.

1. Governance

They specify what they are aiming to achieve and who is responsible within each organisation. They also have a time and reporting stipulations and they have identified standards that support strategic goals.

2. Management

Universities and VET training providers have management systems in place to guide off campus learning. The management process includes how the project fits into strategic targets and learning outcomes.

3. Legal

There are generic equal opportunity, privacy, duty of care and occupational health and safety laws designed to protect students, workers and volunteers. Once these standards are in place they provide the framework for all excursions.

4. Financial

Universities and RTOs organise their finances so that there are staff who take responsibility for  flexible learning arrangements. This is not the task of the academic staff. Financial management will be determined by school funding models and may include costs associated with the off campus activities.

5. Technical

Universities and RTOs have IT systems that capture and share information without the need for duplication.

Want to know more?

Email me for a copy of the How to set up a school – industry partnership framework.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Get a support team – Don’t leave year 12 without it

Don’t dance in the dark alone

If you want to collect butterflies or fly to the moon, there are people who are already doing it…… and sharing their ideas online. They would love to hear from you.

Look online for magazines, Facebook pages, LinkedIn…. any groups that you might be interested in AND MAKE CONTACT. 

For career advice you can go to these sites 

Useful SitesEmail me if you would like me to email you a copy so that you can get the links live.

Jobs and Skills Centres are Your New Best Friend

The new Jobs and Skills Centres based in West Australian TAFE Colleges are there to guide you into TAFE, employment or university. A new one has just opened in Kalgoorlie.

If you just want to talk call Lifeline

Leaving school is one of the most stressful times of your life. EVERYONE struggles with such a massive change. If you just want to talk with someone call Lifeline.

Lifeline

Call the Expert

If you would like professional career counselling from me email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au. You can check out testimonials on my home page.