In Focus Careers

Creating insanely great career education in Western Australia.


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Create an Insanely Great School Leavers’ Safety Net

Leaving home to study at university or TAFE is a giant leap. Especially for RRR students.

Notre Dame University has a RRR Student Support Program which is like their support for international students. No other Western Australian university or TAFE has anything special in place.

Students flounder. Parents panic.

Stressed parents can help their school leavers to make the giant leap seem more like a hop by doing these things.  Tell them to….

1.   Get a Mentor

People love it when you value their knowledge and expertise so getting a mentor isn’t rocket science. Just be nice and value what the mentor tells you. Find someone whose subject knowledge you value and start to ask them for advice and support.

TAFE

Vocational colleges like TAFE do not have formal mentor programs.

Students will need to put in some effort to find a good mentor. They may choose to build a mentor relationship with a lecturer, with one of the many technical experts that work in colleges or with an older student.

This will be their “go to” person when they are wondering what is coming next or how to do something.

Uni

Universities have formal mentor programs.

The mentors are older students who are building their resumes by demonstrating leadership through mentoring.

New students are often allocated a mentor during orientation. If you didn’t get one, or if you didn’t get along with your mentor, go to the guild, or student services office, and ask for a mentor in your faculty.

Getting a mentor means you are consciously and deliberately working towards a successful career. That can’t be a bad thing.

2.   Find and Use Support Services

Support services are numerous and varied, and they are usually free.  You really are not alone but unearthing the support service you need may take some digging.

  • Career Counsellors. Most tertiary education institutions have career counsellors. These can be your lifeline when you start to doubt your subject or course choices. Don’t just drop out. Go to one of the counsellors to see what you can do.

 

  • Specialist Support. There will be support for students with identifiable different needs, like Aboriginal students, people with a disability or people from non English-speaking backgrounds. If you are eligible for these services, take advantage of them.

 

  • Classes in Study Skills. There may be classes on study skills, or how to write an essay. They will be designed to address a problem like not knowing how to study most efficiently, or how to write an essay with correct referencing. These skills can save you hours throughout your student career.

 

  • Industry Group Services. Some industry groups, like the building and construction industry, provide mentors, scholarships, mental health programs and industrial relations support through the union. Google your industry to find what support services they offer.

 

  • Specialist Industry Support. Specialist support groups, like Women in Science and Technology and associations like the Marketing Association, the Accountants Association or the Australian Computer Society can help you while you are studying, give you a network for applying for jobs and they will be able to tell you about scholarships, internships and financial support.

3.   Stick with Family and Family Friends

Leap and the Net will appear PNGHaving the freedom to do what you like away from home is exciting. Taking risks is part of the excitement.

New students are a target for crooks and scammers. The crooks and scammers don’t come with it written on their foreheads. They are usually nice, friendly, helpful people who know how to win the trust of a new student.

Believing the old Zen saying, Leap and the net will appear and keep you safe whenever you take a risk, could result in you getting a criminal record or being physically assaulted.

Make a formal plan to stay connected with family and old family friends. If you are unsure about someone, invite them to come with you when you visit your family.

If you don’t feel comfortable inviting them to meet your family or family friends, check your own feelings. Your innate wisdom may be telling your something.

If you invite your new acquaintance and they choose not to come a few times, you will start to question their friendship.

If they do come, and your family does not feel comfortable about this new person, listen to your family. They are the ones who will provide a safety net that protects you as you leap into your new life.

4.   Say “YES, and …”

If you just learn from class when you go to uni or TAFE, you are missing out.

post-it-notes-There is so much more to enjoy. There are so many opportunities to engage with your industry, enter competitions, take on projects, join clubs, go for scholarships.

Don’t just wait for an opportunity to fall into your lap. Look for things that might interest you on campus noticeboards and join online groups to find out what is going on.

When you hear about an opportunity on campus say “Yes, and where do I apply, what else can I do, when can I start?”

Growth opportunities are generally set up by your campus to help you to have a better student experience.

Just by applying you are creating your own opportunities. You might find out where you are going by setting out in a different direction.

5.   Create a Small Group

If you have friends from school studying at your campus they are your obvious first point of contact. You will soon be overwhelmed with new people who are vying for your attention and you will be trying to connect with new people who you meet.

Trying to be friends with everyone will exhaust you. Focus on a small group and establish friendships with them.  You can make friends with other people later.

HINT: Be nice to everyone. There is a good chance you will be in the same workplace as them at some stage in your career. It is important that they remember how great you are.

Find out what careers information came out this month. Get a free copy of the latest In Focus Careers Newsletter.

 

 

 

 


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November Careers Newsletter Out Now

NewsletterAs our Year 12s head into ATAR exam rooms or out into the school free zone I am aware that they are heading into the most risky time of their lives.

The last In Focus Careers Newsletter for the year has just been released with lots of information for school leavers.

Contact me for a complimentary copy.

 

 

 

 


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Coggle Map of Useful Govt Jobs and Careers Websites

Useful Websites Coggle

If you would like a copy of the map with active links email me Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au  You will need to download the free Coggle application to use the map.

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Keep up to date with career developments in WA. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 

 


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This is how you get an apprenticeship in WA

Bottom line??? Getting an apprenticeship or traineeship IS getting a job… with low pay and lots of training…. which is usually paid for by the employer.

 

Difference between Apprentices and Trainees

When you complete your apprenticeship or traineeship you are qualified to work in your field, at your chosen qualification level.

  • An apprentice is a qualified tradesperson (painter, electrician etc).
  • A trainee is qualified in their chosen field (IT, hospitality, mining, child care etc).

Coggle with pics

Step 1 Discover what Apprenticeship/Traineeship you want

  • If you don’t have a career advisor at school go to one of the Jobs and Skills Centres and ask for help to find a career that matches your abilities and what you like. These Centres are West Australia’s first point of call for people wanting career help.
  • You can do some online research at home by exploring some of these Career Tools and Resources. 

Once you know what road you want to take you need to find someone who will give you a chance to get started.

Step 1 Discovery

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 2 Develop Your Resume

If you are a school leaver you may not have much to put into your application. Google helps you to put together a resume HERE. Youth Central is a Victorian Government site that has job application writing advice for school students from Year 10.

Step 2 Resume

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 3 Find a Job

If you haven’t been to a Jobs and Skills Centre yet, go now. They will help you to be confident about your career choice, they will check your resume and they will explain the differences between direct employment and employment by a Group Training Organisation.

The Australian Apprenticeship Support Network has been set up to support apprentices and trainees and employers. Find your closest one and contact it for help.

Go to your Family and Friends

Many jobs aren’t advertised. Let your extended family know you are looking for an apprenticeship or traineeship in … whatever your choose…..and ask them to ask their friends if they know of anything. You may be lucky to find someone you know who will give you a chance.

Check Job Ads

Go online and look for jobs in the field you are interested in. Check out Seek, Jora or Indeed.

Go to a Group Training Organisation

Group Training Organisations employ apprentices and trainees and place them with one or more host employers. You can be rotated around different jobs in one big host organisation like BHP or government or you can be rotated around a number of small employers to help you to get experience across the industry.

You can find a Group Training Organisation near you by checking HERE .

Group Training Organisations have job boards where they advertise apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities.

The Group Training Organisation will:
  • Provide mentor support to job seekers.
  • Select which applicant to employ for each position.
  • Place them with host employers.
  • Pay the wages, any allowances, superannuation, holiday pay etc.
  • Make sure good quality training is happening, both on the job and off the job at TAFE.
  • Care for apprentices/trainees and host employers.
Step 3 Job Hunting

For a copy of this Coggle Map email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 4 Go for Job Interviews

There is plenty of online help to improve your interview skills.

You can look for the advice on:

Stand on the Shoulders of Giants

Some industries have mentors.  They are usually leaders or experts in their industry who volunteer their time to help new people to succeed in their industry.

Your chances of getting and succeeding in an apprenticeship or traineeship can be vastly increased by getting a mentor.

You can find a list of mentors HERE.

Step 4 Job Interview

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Summary

The world of apprenticeships and traineeships can be confusing. Finding your way from school through the hoops required to land an apprenticeship or traineeship can be tough.

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Keep up to date with career developments. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 

 


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How to Blitz Your Apprenticeship Application

How good is your handshake?

The Apprentice Site Support Advisor at Rio Tinto said nothing gives her a worse first impression than a weak or bone crusher handshake.

Companies are preparing their 2019 apprenticeship vacancy ads so it was a good time to hear employers and three apprentices talk at the CCI Developing Our Future Workforce workshop.

The gave these tips on how to apply successfully:

Give the Employer the Right Gut Feeling

One employer said he goes on “Gut Feeling” and others agreed with him.

The gut feeling started with a good written application. School leavers can get tips on how to write a good resume and cover letter HERE at Youth Central.

How to get an apprenticeship

Check this video.  It gives tips on how to make a good impression.

Apart from having a friendly handshake you can give a good impression if you dress neatly, smile and show that you have done some research on the company.

  • The apprentices on the panel found their jobs through Seek.com.au or through a career advisor.
  • Two people on the panel worked as Trades Assistants as they applied for apprenticeships. This gave them industry-ready skills and showed they were interested in the work.
  • Employers liked applicants who had done volunteer or part time work as it showed their enthusiasm and meant they would have some work ready skills.
  • Work experience in the field looks good on a resume.
  • Good school results, particularly in metals, maths and engineering were indicators that you might be a good apprentice. Taking a folio of photos of projects they had worked on was a good idea.
  • Start working towards your driver’s license as soon as you turn 16.

One student was doing the off the job training at North Metro TAFE and said the lecturer was great and made sure they all learned what they needed before moving on. Another was studying through Westrac and said they were great too. The other was with Programmed which trains FIFO apprentices for two years in house before they go out on site.

Women and girls interested in trades may find the Programmed National Energy Technician Training Scheme worth applying through. They have 38% females in their trades program. Programmed smaller

 

Australian Apprenticeship Pathways has a range of information on how to get an apprenticeship.

For advice and coaching on how to get an apprenticeship or traineeship contact me, Bev Johnson at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 


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Don’t Get on the Uni Bus

If you don’t know what to do at uni DON’T GO THERE. The uni bus isn’t the only ride out of school…. And the uni bus fare is a high price to pay when you don’t know where you want to go. Fullscreen capture 28082017 70902 PM.bmp

Two reports out today show that students are DROPPING OUT OF UNI in record numbers and that graduates are TAKING LONGER TO FIND JOBS in their chosen fields.

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  ABC news has a great report here. 

Vocational graduates earn about as much over a lifetime. Fullscreen capture 12092017 83705 AM.bmpAnd get good starting salaries. Fullscreen capture 12092017 83610 AM.bmp

If you don’t know what to do in 2018 go to the Careers Centre in Perth or in regional centres and find out about your options. If you decide to do a VET course ask about government priority courses (courses on the State Priority Occupation List  – SPOL). They could save you a fortune.


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Quick Guide to TAFE

Understanding the Training maze can be confusing. The October Careers Newsletter has a 10 page feature demystifying Vocational Education and Training for teachers, students and their families.

Training isn’t a vanilla option. There are different levels starting from entry or re-entry level through to specialist short upskilling courses and university pathway programs.

Course Level 

School Leaver

AQF (including VET qualifications gained at school)

Sort of like…..

Cert I No requirements No requirements Middle School
Cert II OLNA or NAPLAN Band 8 Certificate I or Certificate II Senior School
Cert III OLNA or NAPLAN Band 8 Certificate I or Certificate II Senior School
Cert IV C Grades in Year 11 WACE General and OLNA or NAPLAN Band 8. Certificate II or Certificate III School Graduate
Diploma or Advanced Diploma Completion of WACE (General or ATAR) Certificate III School Graduate

There is a whole language that training people talk. You can get some decoding skills at Cracking the TAFE Word Code. Fullscreen capture 20092017 43950 PM.bmp

Find out about different types of training, entry requirements, how to save money with your course choice and how to get an apprenticeship or traineeship.

For a FREE sample of the October Careers Newsletter contact Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au.

 

 

 

 


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October Careers Newsletter

The October CAREERS NEWSLETTER  is out with an 8 page feature demystifying Vocational Education and Training. It explains the different types of training, entry requirements, how to save money with your course choice and how to get an apprenticeship or traineeship.

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Career Events

The Career Events Section is calming down in October with only 10 pages of events, opportunities and deadlines this month.

Improving Job Prospects for Young Job Seekers

The Ivan Neville webinar on Improving Job Prospects for Young Job Seekers has a lot of information about what an attractive option TAFE is over uni when you look at the length of time it takes to get a job after graduation and your earning capacity. I summarise his presentation picking out what I found to be the key points.

Teaching Resources

There are pages of teaching resources including two sites that are homes to banks of careers videos and there is information about the new Australian Apprenticeship site with its page for careers teachers.

University News

The University News this month features a new course at Curtin for gifted science students starting in 2018 and a number of new courses that have been released by CQU.

For a FREE sample of the October Careers Newsletter contact Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au.


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Year 12 – WHAT NEXT?

If you are avoiding making a decision about what to do in 2018 it is probably time to take a look at your options.

This simple summary of the main choices available to West Australian school leavers can help you to clarify your decision.

I have the information summarized in a chart which I am happy to send to you if you message me.

Year 12 What Next?Career Advice

You can ignore making a decision about what to do in 2018 but next year will not stop coming just because you ignore it.

ACTION

If you are not clear about what to do in 2018 get help.

  • See your school career counsellor.
  • Get free advice from the Careers Centre in Forrest Place Perth or in regional centres.
  • Each Western Australian university and TAFE College has free career counselling. You are under no obligation to enrol at the place where you get your counselling.
  • Consult a private career planner.

Youth Allowance and Scholarships

Your decision to study may depend on finances. If you are 18 – 24 and you have supported yourself for 18 months you MAY qualify for Youth Allowance.

ACTION

Check the Youth Allowance site to see if there are any benefits that you are eligible for. There is an Ask for Help button which could save you hours trying to get through on the phone. If you need to leave home to study don’t forget to ask about travel allowance.

Also check for financial assistance on the Good Universities Guide site HERE.

There are scholarships for so many purposes, not just academic excellence and they are often only available when you start university or TAFE. Search online for scholarships in your field.  The Good Universities Guide tries to capture most scholarships on its site.

Ask your career advisor for help searching for scholarships.

Spot the Difference

If you want to study in 2018 deciding on uni or TAFE will be a good start. Guess which fashion course is at Curtin University and which is at South Metropolitan TAFE.

In this (course) you will focus on the relationship between garment and body, using a theoretical and contextual framework for understanding national and international trends and the cultural significance and practice of fashion design. In our course you’ll learn how to produce a unique range of garments and accessories for the marketplace. You’ll gain fashion illustration and drawing skills and learn about digital design, pattern making and garment construction.

If you thought the first one was Curtin you are right. University has a more theoretical approach to learning while TAFE has a more practical focus. Pick the learning style that suits you best for 2018.

Uni Pathway

Very few people have a clear idea of what they want to do at university. If you want to start university in 2018 but are not exactly sure what course or subjects to take, apply the same thinking you used in Year 10 when choosing WACE subjects to keep your opportunities open.

ACTION

  • Talk to your school career counsellor about what course to apply for and subjects to take.
  • Go to see a career planner at one or two universities to clarify what course and subjects you wish to take.
  • Decide on your top choices.
  • Apply to your chosen university either via TISC or via Notre Dame or your chosen university.

Unsure about Uni for 2018

If you MIGHT want to go to uni in 2018 APPLY through TISC. If you get offered a place you can accept and DEFER for a year.

ACTION

  • Read Is the Uni Bus Right for You?
  • See a career planner.
  • Apply for a course at your chosen university via the normal TISC or direct application process
  • When you get an offer contact your university to hold your offer and defer it to 2019.

Alternative Pathway to Uni

If you want to go to uni in 2018 but don’t get the required ATAR score there are many alternative pathways you can take.

Some universities will consider your current scores if you have a year between leaving school and starting university. They consider that the break can result in you gaining maturity that will help you to succeed at university.

ACTION

  • Contact me and I will send the latest WA information on alternative pathways at all WA universities including TAFE colleges.
  • See a career planner at the university or training college of your choice.
  • Decide on your best option.
  • Apply for the alternative pathway of your choice.

TAFE Course

If you are clear about what TAFE course you want to take in 2018 contact your chosen college to enrol. Full time TAFE enrolments open on 1st September.

ACTION

  • Talk to your school career counsellor about what course to apply for and subjects to take.
  • Check out North Metro TAFE courses HERE and South Metro TAFE courses HERE
  • Go to see a career counsellor at TAFE to clarify what course and subjects you wish to take. Ask the counsellor to advise you about courses that are subsidised by government because of skills shortages. These courses are on the State Priority Occupation List (SPOL) and are cheaper than many other courses.
  • Decide which course to enrol in.
  • Apply for a place in your chosen course. Check the college website for online applications.

Apprenticeships and Traineeships

Getting an apprenticeship or traineeship is like getting a job.

ACTION

  • Get the apprentice job search app here. That will help you to find your local Group Training Provider in WA.
  • Get help from your school career advisor to prepare your CV ready for job applications.
  • Get references from school before you leave and get copies of them. Get the correct title and contact details of those at school who give you a reference.
  • Ask your family and friends if they know of any apprentice opportunities.
  • Search for apprenticeship opportunities on sites like Indeed, Jora and Seek.
  • There is a list of apprenticeship mentor services that can lead to you getting an apprenticeship. Contact me for the latest list.
  • Ask your local TAFE if they have any pre apprenticeship programs. They can be tricky to get into as demand is always high. Employers often contact their local TAFE to find a good employee to take on as an apprentice.

Gap Year

The Victorian Government provides free unbiased advice about taking a Gap Year HERE.

Finally

If you want to keep up with emerging career opportunities, scholarships and trends, subscribe to the In Focus Careers newsletter. Contact me for a free sampleBev.J@infocus-careers.com.au of M: 0434056412.


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Alternative Pathways to University

ATAR is just ONE Way into Uni

Locker DoorsThere are lots of doors that can lead to a university degree and if you have had one gap year (travelling, working, watching Netflix) it is even easier to go through those doors at some universities.

The alternative pathways are FREE at all universities although quotas have been introduced so numbers are restricted. The government is trying to introduce fees for these pathways and universities are protesting about that so they are largely free at the moment.

Portfolio Entry (Experienced Based Entry)

This pathway is available at a number of WA universities. Demonstrated proof of your abilities via a portfolio of evidence of your academic achievements and abilities, or demonstrated proof of your ability. Portfolio entry is not just restricted to the creative arts.

Curtin University

Curtin1

Step UP – You may be eligible for Step Up if you meet socio-economic or educational disadvantage criteria. If you are eligible and got an ATAR Score between 60 and 69.95 Curtin will automatically bumped up to 70 which is Curtin’s minimum ATAR requirement.

StepUp Bonus – this depends on the applicant’s eligibility, however this gives them an extra 5 bonus points if their ATAR is above 70.

Portfolio Entry  – is not only for the creative courses; it is applicable to courses like Education, Science, Commerce and Health.

Uni Ready Enabling Program – this program is designed to help you gain entry into a range of Health Sciences, Humanities or Curtin Business School undergraduate courses. In terms of the age limit, applicants must be past the compulsory school age (generally that’s about 17 years old).

Enabling Course in Science, Engineering and Health – this course also has the same age limit as UniReady. Depending on their course weighted average, completion of this program will meet relatively higher entry requirements and subject prerequisites, too.

Curtin College offers courses that can result in entry to second year of Curtin’s Bachelor degree program.

Thanks for the update from: Christine Lim Future Student Advisor | Curtin University

Murdoch University

Murdoch-University-logoOn Track – a 14 week course that prepares students for entry to a course with a minimum ATAR requirement of 70.

On Track Sprint – a 4 week course run over the Christmas holidays that may prepare you for entry to a course with a minimum ATAR requirement of 70 or less.

TLC10 – prepares students to apply for Murdoch through a 1 day per week course that runs all year in Mandurah and Rockingham.

Portfolio Entry – you can gain entry to courses that rely on creative talent in media, games art and design and creative writing, photography and web communication via a portfolio demonstrating your work + a number of hoops like WACE and English competence. For Portfolio entry try the Domestic Admissions Team on 9360 7458 or send an email by following this link

Murdoch University Preparation Course – year 11 and 12 courses are combined in this course.

Email info@murdochinstitute.wa.edu.au for information.

Edith Cowan University

ECUECU Access- Eligible students from identified Western Australian schools will receive an automated ATAR adjustment of up to 10 selection ranks to support the entry of students from areas with educational disadvantage:

  • Eligible students with an ATAR of 60 to 69.95 will receive a selection rank adjustment to 70; and
  • Eligible students with an ATAR of 70 and above will receive a selection rank adjustment of 5 to a maximum ATAR of 90.

If your school is listed here and you need to find out more, please talk to your school careers adviser or contact the ECU Student Recruitment team on 134 328.

UniPrep & UniPrep (Education Assistant Program)– This is a 6 month full time course or 12 months part time.

Portfolio Entry— ECU offers the largest choice of course entry via portfolio.  You need to provide an introductory letter, resume, academic records and references.

Edith Cowan College– Offers courses that can result in entry to second year of ECU’s Bachelor degree program

Thanks Lauren Tyler Events Coordinator, Student Recruitment

University of Western Australia

UWAUWAY – This is an alternative entry pathway and comprehensive support program for students completing Year 12 under challenging circumstances. The program provides academic, financial and personal support, and it is responsive to individual student needs, throughout their final year of secondary school and during their university studies. You can apply for alternative entry to an undergraduate degree course through UWay if your academic achievements have been adversely affected by certain disadvantages.

Broadway  – This scheme allows eligible students from a Broadway-identified Western Australian school to receive an automated ATAR adjustment for their application to UWA.

The Mature Age Access Program allows a mature-aged student with little or no previous background in tertiary study to begin studying under a provisional enrolment without having to meet the standard entry requirements.  Using this program mature-aged students have the opportunity to meet academic and English prerequisites for entry while beginning their course.

Thanks Philip Sharpe, Future Students Centre, University of Western Australia

Notre Dame University

Tertiary Pathway Program – 13 weeks for people who have not met entry requirements.

Program structure

Students complete a one-week Learning for University intensive course during Orientation Week. This course is designed to facilitate your transition into university life and must be successfully completed before you progress to the remaining four courses:

  • Academic Writing
  • Communication Skills
  • Essential Maths
  • Research Skills and Information Literacy

Each faculty has slightly different requirements.

See details about Student Enabling Programs at the Notre Dame site.

 

Central Queensland University

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STEPS (Skills for Tertiary Education Preparatory Studies)

This program is tailored to help you meet entry requirements or boost your confidence. It usually takes between 1 and 2 terms to complete (4 to 8 months). It can be completed online or on-campus.

The STEP course is FREE.

TEP (Tertiary Enabling Program) is an enabling course designed to cater to students of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander heritage.

Thanks to Sandra Emanuel CQU Marketing Coordinator for the update. 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Entry Pathways

Aboriginal FlagAll Western Australian universities and TAFE colleges have Indigenous Entry Programs and specialised support to help students to succeed in their studies.

 

 

Vocational Education and Training Pathway

TAFEStart your degree at TAFE and finish at university.

TAFE frequently has smaller classes and more practical learning than universities.

TAFE courses often provide credit points towards degrees. Check your local college for specific courses details. You can arrange an appointment with a college based career advisor to find out what courses you can take and what credits they will give to university.

North Metro TAFE
South Metro TAFE
Central Regional TAFE
North Regional TAFE
South Regional TAFE

If you want to keep up with changes to alternative pathways at all WA universities, subscribe to the In Focus Careers newsletter.

Contact me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au or on M:0434056412