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What Just Happened? 2021 Career Directions for WA

There are decades where nothing happens; then there are weeks where decades happen.

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin

For decades girls have struggled to be accepted into trade jobs but participation in traditional male trades stubbornly remains at 1%.

For decades women have fought to break through the glass ceiling but today senior executives in Australia are more likely to be called “Andrew” than be female.

Workers’ pay and conditions have declined over decades, as migrants were imported in great numbers to take on poorly regulated “skills shortage” jobs in aged care and horticulture.

2021 brings the promises of change.

1.     Caring Industries

aged care worker

We learned throughout 2020 that many aged care workers undertake this stressful slog in shifts across a range of sites on pay that is comparable to retail work.

Once borders closed, we had to rely on Australians to undertake this work and the poor pay and conditions became transparent.

Future Directions 

  • Aged Care courses are low cost or free as governments struggle to attract people into the industry. Jobs are plentiful.
  • Aged care workers pay and conditions are under scrutiny as we all realise how badly they impacted on staff and our aged relatives.
  • There are suggestions that the West Australian government buy back aged care centres to ensure quality care is provided by well paid, qualified staff.

2.    Girls are Getting a Go in Trades

girls encouraged into trades

By the time the Careers Expo happened in October the building trade exhibitors were working to attract females into their traditional male occupations. Even the Master Builders Association had a tradie bloke in a pink high viz vest trying to make the building trade appear as if it was now more female friendly.

Future Directions

  • Skills shortages are costing builders money. Builders are willing to take on anyone with a good attitude towards their industry.
  • If you want support to go into one of these traditional male occupations the Department of Communities has a list of organisations that provide help. Look for Organisations that Support Women in STEM and Trades on the government site.

3.     Harvest Woes

apple picking

Late last year I suggested that adventures awaited school leavers who chose to bring in the end of year harvest.

As Australians investigated the work conditions and pay that was being given to the traditional backpacker workforce, they walked away.

While most farmers are good employers, there was a storm of horror stories of harvest workers being ripped off.

Future Directions

The agriculture and horticulture industries are scratching their heads to develop a regime that delivers good pay and conditions adn brings stability to workers.

 4.     Defence Industry in WA

There has been a boom in defence industry opportunities, not only for those directly employed by the industry, but for businesses that are supplying goods and services to defence. The boom has been so significant and wide ranging that the Jobs and Skills Centre site has a special page dedicated to what is happening.

Future Directions

  • A wide range of well-paid and specialist occupations will emerge through this investment.
  • Check out the potential careers through the Jobs and Skills Centre page or through the Rockingham Jobs and Skills Centre

5.     Agriculture

agriculture arable barley blur

Agriculture continues to struggle to throw off its old fashioned image as it tries to reflect its place as world leading in the production of high quality, clean, traceable food.

Future Directions

Application of Western Australia’s’ specialist and scientific knowledge of dry land farming will see opportunities for the creation of artificial intelligence to guide farming as the impacts of climate change grow.

6.     Mining

abandoned abandoned building architecture building

While mining doesn’t directly employ many people, the flow on impact of mining in Western Australian has seen us become world leaders in mining technology.

Future Directions

There are big opportunities for the development of knowledge industries in Western Australia through mining and through agriculture, defence and health industries.

It is estimated that there will be 3000 data science jobs created in WA in the next decade.

7. What’s an Epidemiologist?

crop chemist holding in hands molecule model

In 2019 I didn’t know what an epidemiologist did. Now I have had enquiries from several clients about epidemiologist careers in WA.

Future Directions

Murdoch is building a new medical research facility adjacent to Fiona Stanley Hospital.

Notre Dame and Murdoch will be working together to train doctors and medical research specialists.

Western Australia has a world class health care industry and future careers in the industry are looking good.

Keep up to date with the latest career news in Western Australia. Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water, so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Become part of the network of West Australian professionals who are working to deliver the best career support in the world. 

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

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How to build your career online in 2021

Millennials and Gen Z’s need to learn how to build their career online. The move to working from home will be the biggest long term career impact of COVID. If your work can be done on a computer, you need to know how to build your career remotely.

The future of working from home can be seen in Google which has no plans to go back into the office before mid 2021, and Twitter which has told its staff that they can work from home forever.

Companies have found that worker outputs improved, costs of running an office have shifted and the workforce has become more flexible by moving to remote working. Working from home is here to stay.

“[We have] changed the ways we work. This is supported through the greater use of digital and technological solutions and adopting a more flexible and trusting mentality.”
— Engineering & construction CEO, UK

Here are some baby steps to start building your career in a remote world.

Tip 1: Get a decent camera and sound system. Turn on your camera

Get a good camera and sound system
  • Men tend to leave their cameras on, women turn them off. Leaving your camera on makes it easier for your audience to connect with you.
  • If your voice is echoing, put a towel on the desk in front of you to stop the sound bouncing.
  • Close your curtains and get a softer light. There is a reason television studios have lighting specialists. Bad lighting can make you look like a stunned rabbit.
  • Check out some videos on how to look good on camera. People may have moved online but they still want human contact and you need to know how to make the best impression.
  • You need a good reception. This is a big disadvantage for rural, regional and remote people and there are still black spots in the metro area. My daughter has broadband to the home. I go to her place to do webinars.

Tip 2: Show your workspace on the screen

Background gives context
  • Lose the generic background provided by Zoom.
  • Check what is behind you that will show up on the screen. Make sure you like it.
  • Showing your workspace provides warm data about the context you are working in. People will understand your context and trust you faster.

Tip 3: Be like Bunnings

  • People on the Bunnings ads are just like the lovely helpful people in the store. They are Bunnings employees.
    • Look like a person in your industry. Don’t surprise your audience.
  • Bunnings always have a special to talk about and they want us to spend our money with them.
    • Be clear about what you have to offer and why you are connecting.
  • Bunnings ad staff know their stuff. Be authentic when you talk about your stuff.
    • A scientist I work with recently came into a webinar late and frazzled after dealing with her 2 year old. She had us all laughing before she started talking about her stuff.
  • Bunnings staff smile.
    • Everyone loves Richard Branson. No one likes Rupert Murdoch. Richard Smiles. Rupert scowls.

Summary

  1. Get good worktools and learn how to use them.
  2. Show your context to quickly make connections
  3. Build a friendly presentation strategy.

Learn more about 21st century careers at:

Become part of the network of West Australian professionals who are working to deliver the best career support in the world. 

Keep up to date with the latest career news in Western Australia. Subscribe to the Infocus Careers Newsletter as your first step towards linking to a world of insanely great career ideas.

EMAIL: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au 

I come across careers information for adults every month as I am putting together the In Focus Careers News for schools. I have collated it in this monthly supplement because so many people have no idea what is available or where to start looking.

I hope it helps you to create a better life for yourself.

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Infocus Careers is an independent organisation which is solely supported by insanely great subscribers who share information with me, support each other and help me to pay my bills.

I can talk about careers under water so if you would like to chat about how I can help you to improve your career or the services you deliver, give me a ring on 0434056412 or email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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A Robot Will NOT Take Your Job

No no and no.

  • Robots are NOT taking your jobs.
  • You will NOT spend your life scrambling for 17 jobs in 5 careers.
  • Millenials are NOT more focused on meaningful work than baby boomers.

hand-1571849_1920

The Career Development Association of Australia (CDAA) is keen to reduce anxiety by debunking these myths.

On their Making Sense of Career Research webinar they debunked three myths.

Robots are NOT Taking Your Jobs

Bad news travels fast and there is reason to be fearful. There are not many chimney sweeps around… even chimneys are disappearing!!Chimney Sweep canva (2017_09_18 00_22_14 UTC)

But jobs are NOT disappearing. Since the introduction of IT across industries, the amount of work has actually increased.

Machines haven’t REDUCED housework

Laundry

Our behaviour will change because of the machines. Before we had washing machines doing washing was hard, and time consuming. Not it is easy, but still time consuming because we wash our clothes more often.

Houses are cleaner, food is more interesting, we stay awake longer.

Machines have changed the way we live, and there are lots of jobs in our new way of living.

Artificial Intelligence Won’t Replace ALL Workers

If a some sauce is spilt on the floor at McDonalds, it takes a person a second to wipe it up. That task would take very sophisticated AI and it would be slower and more expensive than a human.

The same with self driving vehicles. It takes a lot of AI to account for every possible accident. It is more likely that technology will make us better drivers by helping us to park without crashing, showing us which route to take, or warning us when we are about to run out of fuel.

Where will the jobs be?

  • The Naked Scientist podcast Life in the Year 2100 talks about all the jobs required to create sustainable futures and build smart cities with intelligent buildings. They claim gardeners will be more important as green space makes people physically and mentally healthier.

Future of Work

  • The Future is Human is an optimistic report with lots of practical recommendations for future success. You can see a Press Club presentation on the report by Deloitte economics Chris Richardson, HERE.

You will NOT have 17 jobs in 5 careers

Since 2000 Australian’s have stayed in jobs longer.  We used to stay in jobs for 3 years and now we stay for 4.

It is likely that you will stay in a job for a shorter time at the start of your career, as you work at McDonalds or travel overseas, then stay longer as you go through your career.

On the Making Sense of Research CDAA webinar Jason Brown gave this explanation of how absurd it would be to try to totally change careers and start learning from scratch again.

Future of work jason Brown

You can relax. In 2000 we stayed in jobs for about 3 years, now we stay in jobs for about 4 years.

Millenials are NOT more focused on meaningful work than baby boomers

I was pleased to hear this. I have always sought meaningful work and I’m a baby boomer. Claims that young people are more focused on finding meaningful work than me, seemed to be dismissing my life’s work.

volunteer girl fire fighter

In COVID-19 and careers: On the futility of generational explanations, Cort W. Rudolph, and Hannes Zacher say:

It is common to broadly group people of different ages into “generations” and to speak of distinctions between such groups in terms of “generational differences.” The problem with this practice, is that there exists no credible scientific evidence that (a) generations exist, (b) that people can be reliably classified into generational groups, and (c) that there are demonstrable differences between such groups.

We have already noted an emerging generationalized rhetoric that has characterized how people of different ages have been affected by and reacted to the COVID-19 pandemic. …..We urge researchers to eschew the notion of generations and generational differences and consider alternative lifespan development theoretical frameworks that better capture age-graded processes.

Thanks to career professionals 

It is great to have professionals from the CDAA debunking myths that make us feel bad.

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If your organisation works with young West Australians you can keep up to speed with what is happening on the careers front by subscribing to my insanely great newsletter.

Join more than 120 schools and organisations that tap into a network of careers experts around the State so that they can deliver the BEST careers information to their students and clients. 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Steps to Survival in the Future Workforce

You may be feeling that your future is spinning out of control. Breathless reports of the latest discovery that is going to take your job add to the confusion.

The skills you need to survive in the future won’t be too different to ones you needed in the past. 

1. Be Aware

Keep up with changes so that they aren’t overwhelming:

World Economic Forum Newsletter

The World Economic Forum is the leader in thinking about how to cope with the future. They don’t have all the answers but they are the smartest. They meet in Davos each year to talk about issues and they are a conduit to reports and advice.

You can subscribe to their emails here.

Naked Scientist Podcast

I liked the information about emerging jobs in this Naked Scientist podcast on Life in the Year 2100. Go to the 24 minute mark to get to the best bits. Naked scientist

The Third Industrial Revolution Video

For something radical and inspiring go to Jeremy Rivkin’s iconic Third Industrial Revolution.  He paints a bleak picture for a lot of the video but comes up with optimistic positive strategies later.

The New Work Smarts

Any of the reports from the Foundation for Young Australians provide great guidance about where we are heading and what to do. Perhaps the New Work Smarts provides the clearest direction on how to create your work safety net.

2. Build a Strong Network

Your family and friends will be your support framework throughout your life. They will  celebrate your wins and help you when you are down.Bear joke.jpg

A strong network doesn’t just happen. You may be lucky and have a great family. Your school may be a honey pot of fantastic friends. Or you may have to design your own network. Choose carefully.

Don’t waste time on losers. Think about the sorts of friends you want. Don’t suck up to them. Check out who is around.

This Coggle map I named Stand on the Shoulders of Giants. It may give you some ideas on how to consciously and deliberately build a strong network.  Stand on the Shoulders of Giants

3. Be Good at Something

Alan Finkle is Australia’s Chief Scientist. He recommends that you develop “T shaped” skills.

First, be aware that employers look for “T-Shaped” individuals, where the vertical pole of the T represents deep discipline-specific knowledge and the horizontal bar of the T represents 21st Century skills. Restrict your focus to one or the other and you will be limiting your employment options.

Don’t expect to leave school, uni or TAFE and be the expert. Speak to any employers and they will give you examples where the person with the better interpersonal skills got the job over the academic expert. It has never been more important to keep on learning in order to remain the expert.

Skills WEF

So, what next?

I keep researching and networking to keep up to speed with what is happening. It can be overwhelming but careers teachers are keeping their eye on the ball and they are the best ones to go to for information and advice.

Most West Australian high schools subscribe to my newsletter. You can get a complimentary copy to check out.

In Focus Careers Newsletter

Get career information from a network of insanely great West Australian career professionals:

Testimonial:

I loved this month’s newsletter! There were so many useful links that I’m going to use like the Logistics Training Council publications and the Future skills Framework infographic on our demographic (Durack). So much handy information – I even signed up for the Public Sector commissions job search so that I can pass onto students (past/present) when opportunities come up for traineeships. (Northern regional Catholic Education School)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 

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Millennials need Meaning

Millennials are passionate about finding “value” in their lives and work. They have seen employers use and abuse their families and are saying “No” to that. Great stuff.

Mariana Mazzucato writes about  The Value of Everything: making and taking in the global economy (2018) where she identifies issues for 21st century economies.

You can hear Mariana Mazzucato’s ideas on reframing value on Saturday Extra here.

I am unearthing new ideas about the future of work every day. Subscribe to my In Focus Careers Newsletter to keep up to date with changes as they evolve.