In Focus Careers

Insanely great career advice.


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Create an Insanely Great School Leavers’ Safety Net

Leaving home to study at university or TAFE is a giant leap. Especially for RRR students.

Notre Dame University has a RRR Student Support Program which is like their support for international students. No other Western Australian university or TAFE has anything special in place.

Students flounder. Parents panic.

Stressed parents can help their school leavers to make the giant leap seem more like a hop by doing these things.  Tell them to….

1.   Get a Mentor

People love it when you value their knowledge and expertise so getting a mentor isn’t rocket science. Just be nice and value what the mentor tells you. Find someone whose subject knowledge you value and start to ask them for advice and support.

TAFE

Vocational colleges like TAFE do not have formal mentor programs.

Students will need to put in some effort to find a good mentor. They may choose to build a mentor relationship with a lecturer, with one of the many technical experts that work in colleges or with an older student.

This will be their “go to” person when they are wondering what is coming next or how to do something.

Uni

Universities have formal mentor programs.

The mentors are older students who are building their resumes by demonstrating leadership through mentoring.

New students are often allocated a mentor during orientation. If you didn’t get one, or if you didn’t get along with your mentor, go to the guild, or student services office, and ask for a mentor in your faculty.

Getting a mentor means you are consciously and deliberately working towards a successful career. That can’t be a bad thing.

2.   Find and Use Support Services

Support services are numerous and varied, and they are usually free.  You really are not alone but unearthing the support service you need may take some digging.

  • Career Counsellors. Most tertiary education institutions have career counsellors. These can be your lifeline when you start to doubt your subject or course choices. Don’t just drop out. Go to one of the counsellors to see what you can do.

 

  • Specialist Support. There will be support for students with identifiable different needs, like Aboriginal students, people with a disability or people from non English-speaking backgrounds. If you are eligible for these services, take advantage of them.

 

  • Classes in Study Skills. There may be classes on study skills, or how to write an essay. They will be designed to address a problem like not knowing how to study most efficiently, or how to write an essay with correct referencing. These skills can save you hours throughout your student career.

 

  • Industry Group Services. Some industry groups, like the building and construction industry, provide mentors, scholarships, mental health programs and industrial relations support through the union. Google your industry to find what support services they offer.

 

  • Specialist Industry Support. Specialist support groups, like Women in Science and Technology and associations like the Marketing Association, the Accountants Association or the Australian Computer Society can help you while you are studying, give you a network for applying for jobs and they will be able to tell you about scholarships, internships and financial support.

3.   Stick with Family and Family Friends

Leap and the Net will appear PNGHaving the freedom to do what you like away from home is exciting. Taking risks is part of the excitement.

New students are a target for crooks and scammers. The crooks and scammers don’t come with it written on their foreheads. They are usually nice, friendly, helpful people who know how to win the trust of a new student.

Believing the old Zen saying, Leap and the net will appear and keep you safe whenever you take a risk, could result in you getting a criminal record or being physically assaulted.

Make a formal plan to stay connected with family and old family friends. If you are unsure about someone, invite them to come with you when you visit your family.

If you don’t feel comfortable inviting them to meet your family or family friends, check your own feelings. Your innate wisdom may be telling your something.

If you invite your new acquaintance and they choose not to come a few times, you will start to question their friendship.

If they do come, and your family does not feel comfortable about this new person, listen to your family. They are the ones who will provide a safety net that protects you as you leap into your new life.

4.   Say “YES, and …”

If you just learn from class when you go to uni or TAFE, you are missing out.

post-it-notes-There is so much more to enjoy. There are so many opportunities to engage with your industry, enter competitions, take on projects, join clubs, go for scholarships.

Don’t just wait for an opportunity to fall into your lap. Look for things that might interest you on campus noticeboards and join online groups to find out what is going on.

When you hear about an opportunity on campus say “Yes, and where do I apply, what else can I do, when can I start?”

Growth opportunities are generally set up by your campus to help you to have a better student experience.

Just by applying you are creating your own opportunities. You might find out where you are going by setting out in a different direction.

5.   Create a Small Group

If you have friends from school studying at your campus they are your obvious first point of contact. You will soon be overwhelmed with new people who are vying for your attention and you will be trying to connect with new people who you meet.

Trying to be friends with everyone will exhaust you. Focus on a small group and establish friendships with them.  You can make friends with other people later.

HINT: Be nice to everyone. There is a good chance you will be in the same workplace as them at some stage in your career. It is important that they remember how great you are.

Find out what careers information came out this month. Get a free copy of the latest In Focus Careers Newsletter.

 


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November Careers Newsletter Out Now

NewsletterAs our Year 12s head into ATAR exam rooms or out into the school free zone I am aware that they are heading into the most risky time of their lives.

The last In Focus Careers Newsletter for the year has just been released with lots of information for school leavers.

Contact me for a complimentary copy.

 

 

 

 


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Coggle Map of Useful Govt Jobs and Careers Websites

Useful Websites Coggle

If you would like a copy of the map with active links email me Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au  You will need to download the free Coggle application to use the map.

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Keep up to date with career developments in WA. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 

 


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This is how you get an apprenticeship in WA

Bottom line??? Getting an apprenticeship or traineeship IS getting a job… with low pay and lots of training…. which is usually paid for by the employer.

 

Difference between Apprentices and Trainees

When you complete your apprenticeship or traineeship you are qualified to work in your field, at your chosen qualification level.

  • An apprentice is a qualified tradesperson (painter, electrician etc).
  • A trainee is qualified in their chosen field (IT, hospitality, mining, child care etc).

Coggle with pics

Step 1 Discover what Apprenticeship/Traineeship you want

  • If you don’t have a career advisor at school go to one of the Jobs and Skills Centres and ask for help to find a career that matches your abilities and what you like. These Centres are West Australia’s first point of call for people wanting career help.
  • You can do some online research at home by exploring some of these Career Tools and Resources. 

Once you know what road you want to take you need to find someone who will give you a chance to get started.

Step 1 Discovery

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 2 Develop Your Resume

If you are a school leaver you may not have much to put into your application. Google helps you to put together a resume HERE. Youth Central is a Victorian Government site that has job application writing advice for school students from Year 10.

Step 2 Resume

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 3 Find a Job

If you haven’t been to a Jobs and Skills Centre yet, go now. They will help you to be confident about your career choice, they will check your resume and they will explain the differences between direct employment and employment by a Group Training Organisation.

The Australian Apprenticeship Support Network has been set up to support apprentices and trainees and employers. Find your closest one and contact it for help.

Go to your Family and Friends

Many jobs aren’t advertised. Let your extended family know you are looking for an apprenticeship or traineeship in … whatever your choose…..and ask them to ask their friends if they know of anything. You may be lucky to find someone you know who will give you a chance.

Check Job Ads

Go online and look for jobs in the field you are interested in. Check out Seek, Jora or Indeed.

Go to a Group Training Organisation

Group Training Organisations employ apprentices and trainees and place them with one or more host employers. You can be rotated around different jobs in one big host organisation like BHP or government or you can be rotated around a number of small employers to help you to get experience across the industry.

You can find a Group Training Organisation near you by checking HERE .

Group Training Organisations have job boards where they advertise apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities.

The Group Training Organisation will:
  • Provide mentor support to job seekers.
  • Select which applicant to employ for each position.
  • Place them with host employers.
  • Pay the wages, any allowances, superannuation, holiday pay etc.
  • Make sure good quality training is happening, both on the job and off the job at TAFE.
  • Care for apprentices/trainees and host employers.
Step 3 Job Hunting

For a copy of this Coggle Map email me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Step 4 Go for Job Interviews

There is plenty of online help to improve your interview skills.

You can look for the advice on:

Stand on the Shoulders of Giants

Some industries have mentors.  They are usually leaders or experts in their industry who volunteer their time to help new people to succeed in their industry.

Your chances of getting and succeeding in an apprenticeship or traineeship can be vastly increased by getting a mentor.

You can find a list of mentors HERE.

Step 4 Job Interview

For a copy of this Coggle Map email Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

Summary

The world of apprenticeships and traineeships can be confusing. Finding your way from school through the hoops required to land an apprenticeship or traineeship can be tough.

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Keep up to date with career developments. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 

 


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How to Blitz Your Apprenticeship Application

How good is your handshake?

The Apprentice Site Support Advisor at Rio Tinto said nothing gives her a worse first impression than a weak or bone crusher handshake.

Companies are preparing their 2019 apprenticeship vacancy ads so it was a good time to hear employers and three apprentices talk at the CCI Developing Our Future Workforce workshop.

The gave these tips on how to apply successfully:

Give the Employer the Right Gut Feeling

One employer said he goes on “Gut Feeling” and others agreed with him.

The gut feeling started with a good written application. School leavers can get tips on how to write a good resume and cover letter HERE at Youth Central.

How to get an apprenticeship

Check this video.  It gives tips on how to make a good impression.

Apart from having a friendly handshake you can give a good impression if you dress neatly, smile and show that you have done some research on the company.

  • The apprentices on the panel found their jobs through Seek.com.au or through a career advisor.
  • Two people on the panel worked as Trades Assistants as they applied for apprenticeships. This gave them industry-ready skills and showed they were interested in the work.
  • Employers liked applicants who had done volunteer or part time work as it showed their enthusiasm and meant they would have some work ready skills.
  • Work experience in the field looks good on a resume.
  • Good school results, particularly in metals, maths and engineering were indicators that you might be a good apprentice. Taking a folio of photos of projects they had worked on was a good idea.
  • Start working towards your driver’s license as soon as you turn 16.

One student was doing the off the job training at North Metro TAFE and said the lecturer was great and made sure they all learned what they needed before moving on. Another was studying through Westrac and said they were great too. The other was with Programmed which trains FIFO apprentices for two years in house before they go out on site.

Women and girls interested in trades may find the Programmed National Energy Technician Training Scheme worth applying through. They have 38% females in their trades program. Programmed smaller

 

Australian Apprenticeship Pathways has a range of information on how to get an apprenticeship.

For advice and coaching on how to get an apprenticeship or traineeship contact me, Bev Johnson at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 


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Get Out of School Early Guide

Leaving school early IS AN OPTION. It does NOT mean you will never get a job, or that you will live on the streets for the rest of your life.

School isn’t for everyone. It makes some people’s lives a total misery.

hATE SCHOOL

In Western Australia the government requires students to get special permission to leave school early by applying for a Notice of Arrangement. You can find details of that HERE.

Don’t Jump Too Soon

Once you have made up your mind to leave it is difficult to change your mind. As soon as you start thinking of leaving talk to a career advisor. There may be alternatives that they can offer through the school or they may be able to organise a smooth transition from school for you. Jump off a cliff

Once you leave school people who can help you get limited funding so their capacity to help is limited.  Stick with your school and get as much FREE help as possible before you leave.

Getting help with your resume is a good start.

Decide What You Are Going to Do When You Leave

If you haven’t got a job lined up or a course to go into you may need help to get that sorted.

Many schools have the Career Voyage program that will help you to nail down a career direction for the near future. If you don’t have access to Career Voyage at school you can do the quiz at one of the Careers Centres in Perth or regional centres or contact them online.

I have done this Coggle brainstorm of a bunch of places you can check out to narrow down what you like.

Coggle - Hear Your Dream

Email me Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au if you would like access to the Coggle map so that you can just click on the links.

Study Year 12 at an Alternative College

Look at the available options for completing Year 12 in another setting like Cyril Jackson, Canning, North Lake, Seven Oaks and Tuart Colleges. There are adult students at these colleges and you may find that suits your style.

You can also study your WACE through the School of Isolated and Distance Education. 

You can get free information and advice from each of these schools.

Jobs and Skills Centres

You can get free career advice at the new Jobs and Skills Centres which have been set up in TAFE colleges in the metro area. You can find regional centres HERE. There are Aboriginal Workforce Development Centres HERE

Study the Certificate of General Education for Adults

The Certificate of General Education for Adults is a good non-WACE starting point for people who don’t want to finish school.

There are three levels, certificates I – III. Choose the one that suits your needs.

This certificate often has literacy and numeracy support which can kick start your study in another area. Different colleges will allow you to explore different subject opportunities as part of your study.

TAFE colleges give you access to ongoing support from careers advisors.

TAFEStudy Something Else at TAFE

You can build your employability skills and explore career options through Foundation Skills Course. Check out the list of Foundation Skills courses HERE. 

Equity Course

There are equity courses that support people with disability and people seeking courses that are aligned with their culture; for example, a qualification specialising in Indigenous Australian tourism. Check the list of courses HERE and ask about opportunities at one of the Jobs and Skills Centres – scroll down this page to find the one nearest to you.

Apprenticeships and Traineeships

If you can find someone who is willing to take you on as an apprentice or trainee, you are on a great path.

You can find apprenticeship and traineeship opportunities through Seek and Indeed. Getting an apprenticeship or traineeship is just like looking for any other job. You need to find the opportunity first, then convince the employer that you would be a great employee. You will need a good resume as a starting point.

Youth Central gives good advice to school leavers on how to write a resume.

When you do an apprenticeship or traineeship qualification you need to sign up so that your training is recognised. You sign up at an Australian Apprentice Support provider. You can find one HERE.

The help that they give will not be as good as the help you can get at school so it is best to try to find an apprenticeship and to contact a provider through your careers advisor.

Government Support

You may be eligible for Youth Allowance. This is hard to get but it is worth checking to see if you qualify HERE.

If you qualify for income support you can also get help from JobActive.  You find an Employment Service Provider near you and they will do what they can to help you to find a job.

Employment Service Providers are not well funded and their capacity to give you help is limited. You will probably get more help from school.

Online Course Information

The My Skills website is a directory of vocational education and training (VET) organisations and courses.

Job Jumpstart has an I’m At School section to help students prepare to leave school.

Going to Uni without an ATAR

If you want to leave school and still want to go to uni you can find Alternative Pathways to Uni HERE. 

Get a Safety Plan

Leaving school early IS AN OPTION. Leaving school is however risky, and there is a chance you could fall into a hole without a safety net.

The suggestions to help you to leave school early are easier to do with the help of a careers advisor.

If you can’t get help at school, go to one of the alternative schools or TAFE colleges or even a uni, to get free advice or pay a professional career advisor to help to set you onto the right path.  That help could put you onto the perfect path to your school free future.


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Don’t Get on the Uni Bus

If you don’t know what to do at uni DON’T GO THERE. The uni bus isn’t the only ride out of school…. And the uni bus fare is a high price to pay when you don’t know where you want to go. Fullscreen capture 28082017 70902 PM.bmp

Two reports out today show that students are DROPPING OUT OF UNI in record numbers and that graduates are TAKING LONGER TO FIND JOBS in their chosen fields.

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  ABC news has a great report here. 

Vocational graduates earn about as much over a lifetime. Fullscreen capture 12092017 83705 AM.bmpAnd get good starting salaries. Fullscreen capture 12092017 83610 AM.bmp

If you don’t know what to do in 2018 go to the Careers Centre in Perth or in regional centres and find out about your options. If you decide to do a VET course ask about government priority courses (courses on the State Priority Occupation List  – SPOL). They could save you a fortune.