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October Issue Out Now

October BannerPeople are losing faith in the ability of traditional leaders and institution to address problems of today and tomorrow.   No single organisation, discipline or philosophy has the answers to tackle the challenges thrown up by our volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous world.

There is an explosion of activism as young people seek answers by connecting with like-minded people to create new approaches to problems.

A new generation of changemakers is striving to create a better future.

Career information can be the lynchpin that gives school students courage and connections with opportunities to create new ways of being in the world.

The October In Focus Careers Newsletter talks about new tools and strategies that can link your NOW to your best possible FUTURE.

Contact me for a complimentary copy of this insanely great newsletter:

 

 


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How school students will keep winning the 21st century career race

Students are already ahead of the pack when it comes to winning in the 21st century workforce.

School leavers aren’t looking for leaders to follow, they are looking for teams to join.

Forbes Magazine predicted 5 Important Ways Jobs Will Change. 

1. Fluid Gigs

WHY STUDENTS ARE WINNING

Over 60% of senior school students have part time jobs as well as their full time study.

  • They have at least one part time job.
  • They are flexible, often having different jobs or they do more work over holidays.
  • They aren’t fussy about how they earn money – they freelance doing gardening, washing cars, walking dogs, baby sitting.
  • They tap into their network of family and friends to build their network of clients.
  • They have a team of friends who are also flexible and able to work together on a project.

TIPS

  • Grow your skills by organising your friends into teams of babysitters, office cleaners, gardeners or whatever opportunity you can see.
  • Make as many contacts as you can at school. Make contacts with other students, work experience providers, sport coaches.

2. Decentralized  Workforce

WHY STUDENTS ARE WINNING

Sophisticated social media skills and knowledge of project planning software helps students to market their need for work, schedule tasks and communicate with clients or with other team members.

By being their own boss students learn:

  • time management – including juggling peak demands times at school and peak times with other gigs.
  • how to cost jobs
  • resource management – scheduling time for tasks
  • quality control

By working as a decentralized team students learn:

  • communication and trust
  • quality control
  • manage fair money sharing

TIPS

Set up your LinkedIn profile:

  • Capture your skills
  • Ask friends to endorse you
  • Build your network

3. Motivation to Work

WHY STUDENTS ARE WINNING

Students can tap into massive opportunities to support causes while they are at school.

These opportunities frequently hit a chord with students who go on to save orangutans, coach kids with disabilities, become environmentalists.

Believing in what they are doing is a greater motivator for young people than money. They don’t want to be ripped off, but they have a sense of urgency and want to be creating the world as a better place.

TIPS

  • Try for lots of experiences while you are at school.
  • Search Google for volunteer opportunities that you might like.
  • Get on a mission to find what you like.
  • Don’t expect your career to come to you in a blinding flash. It will grow on you.

4. Lifelong Learning

WHY STUDENTS ARE WINNING

School students KNOW about lifelong learning. An accelerating rate of change is one of the few constants in their lives. They expect to learn new ways of doing things all of the time.

TIPS

  • Try MOOCS and other online learning platforms.
  • Follow your work interests online.

5. Technology Augmenting Jobs

WHY STUDENTS ARE WINNING

Students already know that technology can make their lives easier. They know how to use their phones to communicate, research, record and collate and hack information to create new solutions.

Expanding their skills to find new ways to use technology will be natural to them.

TIPS

  • Research where IT is being applied to different jobs you are interested in.

In Focus Careers Newsletter 

My passion is making transition from school easier. Each month I write an insanely great newsletter that makes sure you know about opportunities as they emerge.

Stay ahead of the pack. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter.

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

Bev.Johnson

Insanely great career advice from Bev

So that students can find the easiest and best path from school I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year for students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers and industry experts across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers.

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au


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Calling Education Trail Blazers and Changemakers

Collaboration is Tricky

There is no question…. it is easier to go it alone than to try collaborating. Things get out of control. Things go wrong. 

But schools need to collaborate outside the school to give students the best knowledge, skills and networks to survive in the 21st century.

Trail blazers and changemakers now have a toolkit that will help them to create a collaborative education ecosystem. 

Collaboration Toolkit

The Foundation for Young Australians (FYA), together with the Department of Education and Training and the Innovation Unit, has just launched School-Industry Partnerships: A toolkit to support collaboration for career education.

The Toolkit is BRILLIANT. 

The toolkit comes in three parts, one each for :

  • Educators;
  • Industry; and
  • Parents and Families

It embeds collaboration theory into practical templates, to do lists and checklists. It isn’t quite “follow the bouncing ball” but if you follow the instructions and don’t skip steps or take shortcuts, you will be guided to success.

It has the order of collaboration preparation just right and it respects all parties to a collaborative agreement.

If you thought the FYA New Work Order series was brilliant, step inside this new environment to find something just as good.

The link to these toolkits is here.

Collaboration Requires New Educator Skills

Collaborative education takes you out of the centre of the picture. You become the facilitator of the negotiated educational experience that has agreement from the school, industry partner, student and family.

Managing a collaborative educational environment requires business management skills.

You need to learn how to:

  • Create project plans,
  • Talk with industry partners and negotiate agreements,
  • Manage resources including budgets, and
  • Ensure things don’t go wrong as you head towards learning outcomes.

It is a different way of educating. It requires different skills. There will be support.

To find out more go here: 

https://www.fya.org.au/programs/career-education/

 

 

 


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August Issue Out Now

The August Issue of my insanely great careers newsletter is out now.

For a complimentary copy please email me:

 

Fullscreen capture 210719 110238 AM.bmp-001My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

To help West Australians to discover what is possible and achieve their dreams I will:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year.
  • Provide insanely great personal career counselling.
  • Deliver the best possible information via presentations to schools.
  • Build and support an insanely great network of teachers, industry experts and parents who help to deliver dazzling career information for all West Australians.

 

 

 


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4 Things Your Careers Teacher Gets Right

1. They Care More 

No other teacher cares as much about what you are going to do when you leave school.

Well, that isn’t strictly true. Teaching isn’t just a job. Mainstream teachers care about what their students plan to do…  but their main responsibility is to get students to learn maths, or physics or geography.

The role of a careers teacher is much more important than that!!!

It is the role of the careers teacher to guide students as they unearth their best possible pathway to follow as they leave school. That is their passion. That is what they care about more than any other teacher.

They have a toolbox of aptitude tests and quizzes and exercises and exploration tasks that will help to guide you to your best possible future.

Hear your dream 2Check this Coggle Map to start your own exploring.

2. They know about university degrees

Not only has your career teacher got first hand experience of being a university student, they have kept up their knowledge.

Every year all of the West Australian universities run professional development programs for careers teachers.

These are wonderful relaxing days where careers teachers are pampered, indulged and spoilt as they are given all of the information they could need to recommend THAT PARTICULAR university to hundreds of prospective students.

Cat

These days out are organised by university careers staff who form a close relationship with school based careers teachers. If ever your teacher doesn’t know something about a course, they just ring their friendly uni based career advisor and get the answer for you.

3. They know about apprenticeships and traineeships

This pathway has sometimes been a bit tricky for careers teachers. While many teachers have vocational qualifications they often do these courses part time so don’t have experience as a full time TAFE student.

Once the mining boom came along employers needed trade and technical skills quickly so TAFE courses came into high demand from school leavers. As the digital economy has pushed up the demand for rapid skills acquisition, long theoretical degree programs have been challenged by short, just in time vocational courses.

Careers teachers struggle to keep up with the massive changes that are taking place across all industries so they hook up students who want an apprenticeship or traineeship with experts in the Australian Apprenticeship Support Network .

Apprenticeships and traineeships

This Coggle map gives an overview of how to get an apprenticeship or traineeship. Get more information at This is How You Get an Apprenticeship in WA.

For students wondering about technical or health para professional careers they now hook them up with careers staff or expert lecturers via the Jobs and Skills Centres which started up last year.

Your careers teachers are the kings and queens of networking. They will know who will know the answer to your question.

4. They know about job application and interview skills

There was a woman at the Skills Expo last year telling everyone they were doing their job applications all wrong. They should buy her special  job application course if they ever wanted to get a job.

That just isn’t true.

Careers teachers know what employers are looking for and give you at least ONE good way of writing a job application and cover letter.

They set up mock interview and do their best to make you anxious so that you know what it is like to go for a real job interview.

This is a career teachers fundamental toolkit. They know this stuff and they teach it.

Despite all of that hard work preparing students to go for jobs, employers complain about bad spelling, poor sentences, lack of care, not answering the questions…… yadda yadda.

Career teachers are able to give you all the knowledge and skills you need to write a good job application and do a fair interview. Learn from your school based careers teacher. You don’t have to pay a fortune.

If you would like to do a job application and interview course check out your local Jobs and Skills Centre. They run free courses and will give you one on one support. You don’t have to be thinking of a TAFE course to go to these Centres.

Go to your careers teacher for free advice as soon as possible

Give your careers teacher every chance to help you to unearth what is possible. Go to see them early and follow their advice.

If you have a strong bond with  a year or VET coordinator, or student services teacher you can go to them. Having great rapport with a wise teacher you trust is important. They can consult the professional careers teacher for information and support as you work towards your goal.

Poor career choices can cost you time and money, but more than that. Poor career choices can leave you feeling lost and depressed.

Take your career exploration and discovery seriously while you are in the familiar, supportive school environment with teachers who care about you.

Discovering your dream career could be your reward.

In Focus Careers Newsletter

Get career information from a network of insanely great West Australian career professionals:

Testimonial:

Thanks for the latest e-mail Bev, and for all the information and inspiring ideas over the year. Since I have become a part of  the(In Focus Careers) network I have grown in knowledge and motivation to really make a difference for our young people. 

(South West Regional Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au


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Every student deserves a great careers teacher

The future success of students as they leap into the turbulent world beyond school can depend entirely on the care, wisdom and knowledge of their careers teacher.

When you leave school there is no bridge to your next chapter. There is no magical path into your ideal future.Math teacher smiling

When you leave school your English (maths, history) teacher has finished their job.  They helped you to get the best education in their field. That’s it. Their work is done.

There is no one on the other side of the school gate to make sure you succeed.

Career Advisors Have Done it All Before

teacher female close upIf you had a good careers teacher you will know what waits for you on the other side of the school gate and you will have a plan.

It is the career advisors job to know what is possible. They have guided hundreds of students to discover what is possible and plan how to get there. They love helping students to unearth their dreams.

Go to see your school career advisor. Tap into their wisdom and knowledge.

Their secret power is that they care about your future.

If you don’t have a career advisor to help you, go to a Jobs and Skills Centre and ask for help. It’s free.

Don’t leave school without a plan

coggle-map-3You may be okay while you are still in a supportive, familiar school environment, but leaving school is risky. Australia is experiencing an epidemic of mental health issues in our young adult population. 

Tap into all of the free support and advice that your school has to offer so that you have a plan with you when you leave school.

Tap into support from your career advisor, pastoral care officer, year coordinator… whoever you get along with. Ask them for help to develop a plan. Keep going until you are happy with your plan.

Getting on the Uni Bus

Many school leavers go to uni because they don’t know what else to do.

Uni career advisors come to school. They tell you how wonderful their uni is. They hold out their hand and say,  “Come with me”.

The TISC application arrives.

Fullscreen capture 28082017 70902 PM.bmp

So you all get on the uni bus.

You can check how much that ride will cost you HERE.

Do your research and work with an expert career advisor before you lock yourself in.

Some go to TAFE

needle-in-a-haystack-1752846_1920There are so many VET courses and variations on courses that finding the ideal one for you is like finding a needle in a haystack.

The new Jobs and Skills Centres aren’t just for VET courses. They deliver a guiding light to students who don’t know what to do when they leave school.

Having a Gap Year

The fear of the unknown often stops students choosing a gap year. Those who do make this choice often choose an organised program that supports them into their future.

Find information on taking a gap year HERE.

Ask your career advisor what gap year program will suit your personality and future plans.

Getting a Job

Statistics 1The only problem with getting a job without planning to do any further study is that you are locking yourself into the lowest paid sector or the workforce.

Get a job, sure but do a Certificate III part time after school to set yourself up for a bigger income and more career choices.

Ask your career advisor what part time courses you can take to improve your future career.

In Focus Careers Newsletter

Discover your world of possibilities with a monthly dose of insanely great career news and information:

 

Testimonial

I have found your material invaluable.  The information you have put together is thorough – a one-stop-shop in a sea of information that is out there.  I have utilised this information on a regular basis with others throughout the school.

(South Metropolitan Government High School.)

My Commitment to West Australian Careers Education

For In Focus Careers to be the conduit to Insanely Great Careers Information for West Australian careers teachers and students I undertake to:

  • Write 10 insanely great issues of In Focus Careers newsletter each year that focus on the needs of West Australian students and careers teachers.
  • Search for local, national and international information that could impact on the careers of West Australian students.
  • Connect you with insanely great careers teachers across the In Focus Careers network.
  • Listen to and support West Australian careers teachers
bust-small-72dpi

Bev Johnson

M: 0434 056 412

Email: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 


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Looking for Information from VETiS Teachers

Teachers have lots of sites where they share teaching questions. There is also an Education Department (and Catholic and Independent School) focus on quality of teaching. Is there anything similar for VET?

The closure of VET in Schools Consulting Services has shone a light on how tough life is for VETiS teachers and ALL VET teachers.

I rarely hear VET professionals discusing pedagogy (andragogy, heutagogy). All discussion seems to focus on just surviving under the enormous work pressure, that is at least partially due to the significant compliance demands.

By looking at the Department of Training and Workforce Development latest annual report it looks like there is no teaching or learning expertise in the senior management. You can see that the Executive Director has a significant background in Consumer Protection which sounds like a compliance role. There is financial management and financial compliance expertise and expertise in developing strategic policy and in accounting. Nothing there about teaching or learning.

Annual Report

Even DTWD advisory partners aren’t education experts. The Training Accreditation Council is concerned with compliance and the State Training Board is concerned that the Department is focused on industry needs.

No education best practice gets a look in.

I write a careers newsletter for schools and hear the grievances and barriers faced by VET teachers at the coalface.

I would love to hear from anyone who knows of infrastructure, or sites or even tips that would help those involved in VET delivery to focus more on teaching and less on compliance demands.

Contact me to get a complimentary copy of the In Focus Careers Newsletter:

 

 

 


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Getting together with employers – the Prenup

Your students need to get out more.

Your local council (bakery/architect/hospital) is willing to take on kids for work experience (mentoring/project collaboration).

You are about to form a partnership to give kids this great opportunity.

Harmony 1

STOP!! 

Before you walk into the sunset together…. What about a prenup?

It is best to talk about your prenup with your future partner while things are good.

Things WILL go wrong. The kids will play up or break things. The employer will be away. Duty of care won’t be taken care of.

A prenup on the back of an envelop is better than nothing.

Your prenup should consider:

  • Who is responsible for what and at what quality.
  • How the partnership is to be managed.
  • If there are any legal issues, like duty of care.
  • If there are any costs and who should pay for them.
  • What IT platforms are you going to use to share information.

If you would like to discuss how to write your prenup email me: Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

To stay up to date with careers events and news subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter.

 

 

 


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Careers in Grain Expo Offer to Schools

Western Australia probably grows more grain than… practically anyone….. and there are jobs in everything from international marketing to scientific research to fencing.

Western Australia is a world leader in grain agriculture. There are scholarships and many training pathways into the industry. 

The Careers in Grain people sent through this message:

Last year, we attended 30 different school and university events and look forward to building on the momentum and meeting even more students and job seekers. Be sure to let us know if you hear of any events that you’d love to see us at!

Contact Kayla Evans  to invite her to your school career expo. 

Bust Small 72dpiIf you would like to reach thousands of Western Australian school students with information about careers in your industry, let me know. 

I will share your information in the monthly In Focus Careers Newsletter that goes out to over 100 West Australian high schools. 

If you would like to see a complimentary copy of the newsletter please let me know. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Innovation and Entrepreneurship are a Con

rubbishIf you don’t have a job or are paid low wages clearly you aren’t being innovative and entrepreneurial enough!!!

REALLY!!??

While young people have enthusiasm and ideas being innovative and entrepreneurial also requires:

  • KNOWING how to do that.
  • Leadership.
  • Support.
  • Resources…. money, infrastructure, networks, systems.

(See Harvard Business Review for some thoughts on this.)

Key complaints from young Australians about unemployment are…

 

Complaints V Reasons

          Young Australians                                                     Explanation

1. Young Australians complain that they can’t get a job……..

 

Youth unemployment has rarely been higher
2. Young Australians complain about low wages….

 

Contract work like Deliveroo and Air Tasker…. deliver 3rd World salaries and conditions in Australia.
3. Young Australians complain that they don’t have the experience required for get paid work ……..

 

No other group volunteers as much as millennials.
4. Young Australians complain about unpaid internships that go on for months… Interns often do work that could be done by a paid employee.

Young Australians are at the pointy end of the fourth industrial revolution. You can:

  • Create paid opportunities to learn on the job… like apprenticeships??
  • Replace unpaid internships with a fair wage.
  • Value their unique enthusiasm and ideas.
  • Not expect them to be able to earn you money on DAY 1.

THAT is a better solution that takes the onus off the kids to be like Steve Jobs and become a billionaire from their garage.

Refocus on giving kids a fair go. Employability skills don’t trickle down. New employees don’t magically know how to add value to your business.

Be there for them. It’s your turn to give back.