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It takes a Village to Raise a Student

Western Australia’s capacity to educate students to succeed in a 21st Century Global Village is being crippled by insurance companies regimes. Duty of care has become the overarching education framework that determines students stay on school grounds and risks are averted.

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Teachers’ capacity to engage with any village to enhance the education of students is stifled by a mountain of risk management paperwork.

Duty of care

Schools are becoming islands in a global environment.

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Framework Required

Education providers need to create a framework that enable students to engage in entreprise and work integrated learning activities.

Framework 2

There are just 5 elements to the framework. Once it has been developed it can be used as a template for any collaborative arrangement between schools and the world outside school.

Governance 

Clarify who is responsible for what and to what standard?

Legal

There will be rules that govern the way any collaboration will operate? Duty of care, privacy, equal opportunity and ownership of intellectual property are just some.

Once you have identified a list that your school must comply with you can use it for all projects.

Finance

You need a dedicated budget. Serious efforts to collaborate should not attempt to squeeze more into existing tight budgets.

Business Rules

A good project plan should underpin the project. Project planning templates for all occasions can be found HERE. The project plan will lead to a sound MoU that can act as a template for further collaborations.

IT

Your school will have IT protocols, security frameworks and applications that apply to all IT activity. These issues need to be reconciled with partnering organisations to ensure seamless interoperability.

NSIF Meta Framework

The National Service Improvement Framework is a framework to use to design frameworks.

NSIF

It is a top down model which starts with organisations agreeing on what they want to do and what benefits they are trying to achieve.

VET in Schools Example

The regime that enables VET in schools has been created to support collaboration between education and training providers.

That framework can provide an example of what to do, and also what NOT to do.

For More Information

For a free consultation about how to develop a framework for collaboration for your organisation contact me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

The In Focus Careers Newsletter is a monthly conduit of career information for West Australian teachers and families. If you would like to know what is going on in a world of career opportunities ask for a complementary copy.

 

 


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How to Cash In on the Oil and Gas Jobs Boom

If  Western Australia becomes a global hub for the oil and gas industry, WA school leavers will be set for long term job growth.

Oil and Gas paperThe front page news on the West Australian about the Jobs Bonanza is no surprise to our universities and TAFE colleges that have been gearing up to support our oil and gas industries for years.

The courses are not just for those with engineering degrees. South Metro TAFE has a Diploma on Engineering at its Munster Campus

Diploma in Engineering Oil and Gas

There will be jobs for lawyers negotiating contracts and trying to negotiate the best deal for government or companies.  Murdoch has a course in Oil and Gas Law and UWA has a Mining, Energy and Natural Gas Law Centre. There will be more and new courses launched as the industry grows.

Because these jobs require high level expertise the number of scholarships will increase.

There will also be jobs in service industries like health and education, police and local government to support industry growth.

The downside is the risk to the environment that will increase as the oil and gas industry becomes more powerful. Our need for environmental scientists and carbon sequestering technologies may also be a feature of the boom.

If you would like me to follow up on emerging opportunities in the oil and gas industries contact me at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

 

 

 


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Want the Key to Career Success? Deep Learning

Problem solving skills, creativity, collaboration. For the past 5 years we have been told about the importance of these skills. The tide has turned. There is now a growing emphasis on the need for expertise.

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Soft Skills Alone Won’t Get You a Job

Michelle Hoad, Managing Director of North Metropolitan TAFE, told the VET Careers Forum that soft skills alone are not going to get you a job. She went on to talk about employers clamouring graduates with deep technical skills.

Developing “T” Shaped Citizens

Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel told a recent Maths Association conference that there is a need to develop “T” shaped individuals. The vertical pole is the deep and narrow skills that make you an expert. The horizontal part of the T is the 21st century soft skills like communication and collaboration skills. You need the deep skills, and you need to practice and apply them so that you have something of value to communicate.

The need for rigorous academic study BEFORE you go to university is being pushed aside by alternative pathways to university and the removal of pre-requisite requirements for many courses.

Finkel calls for the reinstatement of pre-requisites by universities to signal they want deep knowledge as well as inquisitive thinkers. He quotes Jeff Bezos who calls for experts with a beginner’s mind. You can hear the Saturday Extra Podcast HERE.

Preparing for the best and worst of timesCore Skills

The message that students need to develop deep understanding also appeared in the recently published and wonderfully named Preparing for the Best and Worst of Times.

This report recommends deep learning and recommends that VET programs focus more on developing underpinning knowledge as a long-term solution to maintaining employment as technologies change.

You can listen to a short podcast about the report HERE but the podcast doesn’t capture the profound recommendations of the full report.

Yanis Varoufakis

Strategic Education and Training Needed

Yanis Varoufakis talks about the dumbing down of education and, at around the 27 minute mark, he proposes changes to education and training policy making in this thought provoking presentation.

Training for the 4th Industrial Revolution

In the face of all this urging for deep skills NCVER published Training for the 4th Industrial Revolution which recommends soft skills!!

So what do you do!!??

I tend to agree with Alan Finkel when he says…. something like….

 …you need to have some knowledge that makes you worth communicating with!!

It seems like the combination mentioned in the conclusion of Skills for a Global Future provide a balanced summary:

The focus of VET must be beyond skilling for a job (and its technical competencies) to one that encompasses ‘soft skills’ and imparts continuous learning and adapting mind sets across a lifetime career that will involve change.

Keep up to date with career developments Western Australia. Subscribe to the In Focus Careers Newsletter at Bev.J@infocus-careers.com.au

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Innovation and Entrepreneurship are a Con

rubbishIf you don’t have a job or are paid low wages clearly you aren’t being innovative and entrepreneurial enough!!!

REALLY!!??

While young people have enthusiasm and ideas being innovative and entrepreneurial also requires:

  • KNOWING how to do that.
  • Leadership.
  • Support.
  • Resources…. money, infrastructure, networks, systems.

(See Harvard Business Review for some thoughts on this.)

Key complaints from young Australians about unemployment are…

 

Complaints V Reasons

          Young Australians                                                     Explanation

1. Young Australians complain that they can’t get a job……..

 

Youth unemployment has rarely been higher
2. Young Australians complain about low wages….

 

Contract work like Deliveroo and Air Tasker…. deliver 3rd World salaries and conditions in Australia.
3. Young Australians complain that they don’t have the experience required for get paid work ……..

 

No other group volunteers as much as millennials.
4. Young Australians complain about unpaid internships that go on for months… Interns often do work that could be done by a paid employee.

Young Australians are at the pointy end of the fourth industrial revolution. You can:

  • Create paid opportunities to learn on the job… like apprenticeships??
  • Replace unpaid internships with a fair wage.
  • Value their unique enthusiasm and ideas.
  • Not expect them to be able to earn you money on DAY 1.

THAT is a better solution that takes the onus off the kids to be like Steve Jobs and become a billionaire from their garage.

Refocus on giving kids a fair go. Employability skills don’t trickle down. New employees don’t magically know how to add value to your business.

Be there for them. It’s your turn to give back.